Wild Alaska Live is a three part series broadcast live across a week and will showcase one of the greatest wildlife spectacles from one of the remotest corners of Earth.

Viewers will be taken on a live adventure, as the crew broadcasts from across the vast wildernesses of Alaska, one of the last and best places in the world to see these spectacular animals in all their glory.

Steve Backshall, Matt Baker and Liz Bonnin will be there at the most crucial time of year for Alaskan wildlife; the annual salmon run triggers the start of a remarkable summer feast as black bears, brown bears, Kodiak bears, orca, humpback whales, salmon, beavers, salmon sharks, walrus, wolves and many others gather for a summer feast like no other on the planet.

Wild Alaska Live - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: None minutes

Premier: 2017-07-23

Wild Alaska Live - Into the Wild (book) - Netflix

Into the Wild is a 1996 non-fiction book written by Jon Krakauer. It is an expansion of a 9,000-word article by Krakauer on Christopher McCandless titled “Death of an Innocent”, which appeared in the January 1993 issue of Outside. The book was adapted to film in 2007, directed by Sean Penn with Emile Hirsch starring as McCandless. “Into the Wild” is an international bestseller which has been printed in 30 languages and 173 editions and formats. The book is widely used as high school and college reading curriculum. “Into the Wild” has been lauded by many reviewers but has also been described by Alaskan reporter, Craig Medred, as being “something invented” by its author.

Wild Alaska Live - Cause of death - Netflix

McCandless survived for approximately 113 days in the Alaskan wilderness, foraging for edible roots and berries, shooting an assortment of game—including a moose—and keeping a journal. Although he planned to hike to the coast, the boggy terrain of summer proved too difficult, and he decided instead to camp in a derelict bus. In July, he tried to leave, only to find the route blocked by a snow-melt swollen river. On July 30, McCandless wrote a journal entry which read, “Extremely Weak. Fault Of Pot[ato] Seed” Based on this entry, Krakauer hypothesized that McCandless had been eating what he thought was the roots of an edible plant, Hedysarum alpinum, commonly known as wild Eskimo potato, which are sweet and nourishing in the spring but later become too tough to eat. When this happened, McCandless may have attempted to eat the seeds instead. Krakauer first speculated that the seeds were actually from Hedysarum mackenzii, or wild sweet pea, instead of the Eskimo Potato, which contained a poisonous alkaloid, possibly swainsonine (the toxic chemical in locoweed) or something similar. In addition to neurological symptoms, such as weakness and loss of coordination, the poison causes starvation by blocking nutrient metabolism in the body. However, Krakauer later suggested that McCandless had not confused the two plants and had in fact actually eaten Hedysarum alpinum. Krakauer had the plant tested for any toxins and, through tests on Hendysarum alpinum, it was discovered that it contained an unidentifiable form of toxin. According to Krakauer, a well-nourished person might consume the seeds and survive because the body can use its stores of glucose and amino acids to rid itself of the poison. Since McCandless lived on a diet of rice, lean meat, and wild plants and had less than 10% body fat when he died, Krakauer hypothesized that McCandless was likely unable to fend off the toxins. However, when the Eskimo potatoes from the area around the bus were later tested in a laboratory of the University of Alaska Fairbanks by Dr. Thomas Clausen, toxins were not found. Krakauer later modified his hypothesis, suggesting that mold of the variety Rhizoctonia leguminicola may have caused McCandless's death. Rhizoctonia leguminicola is known to cause digestion problems in livestock, and may have aided McCandless's impending starvation. Krakauer hypothesised that the bag in which Chris kept the potato seeds was damp and the seeds thus became moldy. If McCandless had eaten seeds that contained this mold, he could have become sick, and Krakauer suggests that he thus became unable to get out of bed and so starved. His basis for the mold hypothesis is a photograph that shows seeds in a bag. Following chemical analysis of the seeds, Krakauer now believes that the seeds themselves are poisonous. The cause-of-death hypothesis presented in the book has been subject to some debate, with the book's author and other sources drawing new conclusions since it was published.

Wild Alaska Live - References - Netflix