Whatever this is. follows Sam and Ari, two production assistants in New York, and Lisa (Madeline Wise), Sam's girlfriend. Sam and Ari are scraping by working on low or unpaid video production gigs thrown their way by Oscar (Ross Hamman), an existentially grumpy middle-man at a small production company. Making rent is hard enough; they barely have time to sneak toward their personal goals and personal lives in their off-hours. Lisa is a teacher and therefore unemployed for the summer. A chance encounter puts her on the road to a possible summer job, but she's not sure where it could lead - or if she's even qualified. Whatever this is. asks a tough question: how long are you expected to do work that you hate, for pennies, until it becomes something that you love that pays the rent? Is it even possible?

Whatever this is. - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2013-07-31

Whatever this is. - Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be) - Netflix

“Que Será, Será (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)”, first published in 1956, is a popular song written by the songwriting team of Jay Livingston and Ray Evans. The song was introduced in the Alfred Hitchcock film The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), starring Doris Day and James Stewart in the lead roles. Day's recording of the song for Columbia Records (catalog number 40704) made it to number two on the Billboard Hot 100 and number one in the UK Singles Chart. From 1968 to 1973, it was the theme song for the sitcom The Doris Day Show, becoming her signature song. The three verses of the song progress through the life of the narrator—from childhood, through young adulthood and falling in love, to parenthood—and each asks “What will I be?” or “What lies ahead?” The chorus repeats the answer: “What will be, will be.” It reached the Billboard magazine charts in July 1956. The song in The Man Who Knew Too Much received the 1956 Academy Award for Best Original Song with the alternative title “Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Será, Será)”. It was the third Oscar in this category for Livingston and Evans, who previously won in 1948 and 1950. In 2004 it finished at #48 in AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema. The title sequence of the Hitchcock film gives the song title as “Whatever Will Be”. It was a #1 hit in Australia for pop singer Normie Rowe in September 1965.

Whatever this is. - Language in title and lyrics - Netflix

The popularity of the song has led to curiosity about the origins of the saying and the identity of its language. Both the Spanish-like spelling used by Livingston and Evans and an Italian-like form (“che sarà sarà”) are first documented in the 16th century as an English heraldic motto. The “Spanish” form appears on a brass plaque in the Church of St. Nicholas, Thames Ditton, Surrey, dated 1559. The “Italian” form was first adopted as a family motto by either John Russell, 1st Earl of Bedford, or his son, Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford. It is said by some sources to have been adopted by the elder Russell after his experience at the Battle of Pavia (1525), and to be engraved on his tomb (1555 N.S.). The 2nd Earl's adoption of the motto is commemorated in a manuscript dated 1582. Their successors—Earls and, later, Dukes of Bedford (“Sixth Creation”), as well as other aristocratic families—continued to use the motto. Soon after its adoption as a heraldic motto, it appeared in Christopher Marlowe's play Doctor Faustus (written ca. 1590; published 1604), whose text (Act 1, Scene 1) contains a line with the archaic Italian spelling “Che sera, sera / What will be, shall be”. Early in the 17th century the saying begins to appear in the speech and thoughts of fictional characters as a spontaneous expression of a fatalistic attitude. The saying is always in an English-speaking context, and has no history in Spain, Italy, or France, and in fact is ungrammatical in all three Romance languages. It is composed of Spanish or Italian words superimposed on English syntax. It was evidently formed by a word-for-word mistranslation of English “What will be will be”, merging the free relative pronoun what (= “that which”) with the interrogative what? Livingston and Evans had some knowledge of Spanish, and early in their career they worked together as musicians on cruise ships to the Caribbean and South America. Composer Jay Livingston had seen the 1954 Hollywood film The Barefoot Contessa, in which a fictional Italian family has the motto “Che sarà sarà” carved in stone at their ancestral mansion. He immediately wrote it down as a possible song title, and he and lyricist Ray Evans later gave it a Spanish spelling “because there are so many Spanish-speaking people in the world”. In modern times, thanks to the popularity of the song and its many translations, the phrase has been adopted in countries around the world to name a variety of entities, including books, movies, restaurants, vacation rentals, airplanes, and race horses.

Whatever this is. - References - Netflix