"The Name of the Game" was actually three series under one title. It rotated among three characters working at Howard Publications, a large magazine publishing company—Jeffrey "Jeff" Dillon, a crusading reporter with People magazine (before there was a real-life People magazine); Glenn Howard, the sophisticated, well-connected publisher; and Daniel "Dan" Farrell, the editor of Crime magazine. Serving as a common connection was Peggy Maxwell, the editorial assistant for each.

The Name of the Game - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 90 minutes

Premier: 1968-09-20

The Name of the Game - The Name of the Rose - Netflix

The Name of the Rose (Italian: Il nome della rosa [il ˈnoːme della ˈrɔːza]) is the 1980 debut novel by Italian author Umberto Eco. It is a historical murder mystery set in an Italian monastery in the year 1327; an intellectual mystery combining semiotics in fiction, biblical analysis, medieval studies and literary theory. It was translated into English by William Weaver in 1983. The novel has sold over 50 million copies worldwide, becoming one of the best-selling books ever published. It has received many international awards and accolades, such as the Strega Prize in 1981 and Prix Medicis Étrangère in 1982, and was ranked 14th on Le Monde's 100 Books of the Century list.

The Name of the Game - To actual history and geography - Netflix

William of Ockham, who lived during the time at which the novel is set, first put forward the principle known as Ockham's Razor, often summarised as the dictum that one should always accept as most likely the simplest explanation that accounts for all the facts (a method used by William of Baskerville in the novel). The book describes monastic life in the 14th century. The action takes place at a Benedictine abbey during the controversy surrounding the Apostolic poverty between branches of Franciscans and Dominicans; (see renewed controversy on the question of poverty). The setting was inspired by monumental Saint Michael's Abbey in Susa Valley, Piedmont and visited by Umberto Eco. The Spirituals abhor wealth, bordering on the Apostolics or Dulcinian heresy. The book highlights this tension that existed within Christianity during the medieval era: the Spirituals, one faction within the Franciscan order, demanded that the Church should abandon all wealth, and some heretical sects began killing the well-to-do, while the majority of the Franciscans and the clergy took to a broader interpretation of the gospel. Also in the background is the conflict between Louis IV and Pope John XXII, with the Emperor supporting the Spirituals and the Pope condemning them. A number of the characters, such as the Inquisitor Bernard Gui (as Bernardo Gui), Ubertino of Casale and the Minorite Michael of Cesena (as Michele da Cesena), are historical figures, though the novel's characterization of them is not always historically accurate. Dante Alighieri and his Comedy are mentioned once in passing. However, Eco notes in a companion book that he had to situate the monastery in mountains so it would experience early frosts, in order for that action to take place at a time when the historical Bernard Gui could have been in the area. For the purposes of the plot, Eco needed a quantity of pig blood, but at that time pigs were not usually slaughtered until a frost had arrived. Later in the year, Gui was known to have been away from Italy and could not have participated in the events at the monastery. Part of the dialogue in the inquisition scene of the novel is lifted bodily from the historical Gui's own Manual for Inquisitors, the Practica Inquisitionis Heretice Pravitatis, for example the dialogue: “What do you believe?” “What do you believe, my Lord?” “I believe in all that the Creed teaches.” “So I believe, My Lord.” Bernardo then points out that what Remigius the cellarer is saying is not that Remigius believes in the Creed, but that Remigius believes that Bernardo believes in the Creed. This is an example given by the historical Gui in his book to warn inquisitors against the slipperiness and manipulation of words by heretics. This use of Gui's own book by Eco is self-consciously of a piece with his perspective that “books always speak of other books”. In this case, the author integrates the historical Bernard Gui's text into his own through the fictional character of Bernardo. Adso's description of the portal of the monastery is recognizably that of the portal of the church at Moissac, France. There is also a quick reference to a famous “Umberto of Bologna”—Umberto Eco himself.

The Name of the Game - References - Netflix