The ancient world was filled with innumerable gods, but what happened to these forgotten entities; where have the old gods gone? Take a journey through faith and time in this enlightening series. Explore the rise and fall of the ancient civilizations of the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Celts, the Romans, the Maya, and the Inca.

The Lost Gods - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

The Lost Gods - Whom the gods would destroy - Netflix

The phrase “Whom the gods would destroy they first make mad” is a phrase spoken by Prometheus in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem “The Masque of Pandora” (1875).

The Lost Gods - Other versions - Netflix

The first version of this phrase appears in Antigone by Sophocles (verses 620-623) as “τὸ κακὸν δοκεῖν ποτ᾽ ἐσθλὸν τῷδ᾽ ἔμμεν' ὅτῳ φρένας θεὸς ἄγει πρὸς ἄταν” meaning “evil appears as good in the minds of those whom gods lead to destruction”. Even this appears to be a borrowing from an earlier, lost Greek play. Subsequently the phrase was used in Latin, “Quem Iuppiter vult perdere, dementat prius” (Whom Jupiter would ruin, he first makes mad), and, in Christian times, “Iuppiter” was replaced by “God” as in “μωραίνει Κύριος ον βούλεται απολέσαι” Another version (“Those whom the gods wish to destroy they first make mad”) is quoted as a “heathen proverb” in Daniel, a Model for Young Men (1854) by William Anderson Scott (1813–1885). Brigham Young quoted the phrase ("Whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad”) in a discourse delivered on March 16, 1856, attributing it as an “ancient proverb.” A prior Latin version is “Quos Deus vult perdere, prius dementat” (Life of Samuel Johnson, 1791) but this involves God, (presumably the Christian God) not 'the gods'. This phrase was also used by British politician (and classicist) Enoch Powell in his 1968 speech on immigration commonly known as the “Rivers of Blood” speech

The Lost Gods - References - Netflix