Drama series follows the life of Prince Gwanghae. Even though he is the child of a concubine, he becomes the crown prince. For the next 16 years, until he becomes the King, Prince Gwanghae suffers through dethronement and death threats. Using physiognomy as a weapon, he is able to become the King.

The King's Face - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Korean

Status: Ended

Runtime: 65 minutes

Premier: 2014-11-19

The King's Face - The King in Yellow - Netflix

The King in Yellow is a book of short stories by American writer Robert W. Chambers, first published by F. Tennyson Neely in 1895. The book is named after a play with the same title which recurs as a motif through some of the stories. The first half of the book features highly esteemed weird stories, and the book has been described by critics such as E. F. Bleiler, S. T. Joshi and T. E. D. Klein as a classic in the field of the supernatural. There are ten stories, the first four of which (“The Repairer of Reputations”, “The Mask”, “In the Court of the Dragon”, and “The Yellow Sign”) mention The King in Yellow, a forbidden play which induces despair or madness in those who read it. “The Yellow Sign” inspired a film of the same name released in 2001. The British first edition was published by Chatto & Windus in 1895 (316 pages).

The King's Face - Influences - Netflix

Chambers borrowed the names Carcosa, Hali and Hastur from Ambrose Bierce: specifically, his short stories “An Inhabitant of Carcosa” and “Haïta the Shepherd”. There is no strong indication that Chambers was influenced beyond liking the names. For example, Hastur is a god of shepherds in “Haïta the Shepherd”, but is implicitly a location in “The Repairer of Reputations”, listed alongside the Hyades and Aldebaran. Brian Stableford pointed out that the story “The Demoiselle d'Ys” was influenced by the stories of Théophile Gautier, such as “Arria Marcella” (1852); both Gautier and Chambers' stories feature a love affair enabled by a supernatural time slip. The name Jeanne d'Ys is also a homophone for the word jaundice and continues the symbolism of The King in Yellow. In Raymond Chandler's 1938 detective story, also titled “The King in Yellow”, the protagonist says “The King in Yellow. I read a book by that title once.” The first season of HBO's True Detective television series revolves around a string of crimes committed by the elusive “Yellow King” with Carcosa also being mentioned on numerous occasions. Black stars are also prominent in reference and imagery during the series.

The King's Face - References - Netflix