Street Justice revolves around a U.S. Army soldier turned metropolitan police detective, Adam Beaudreaux, and Grady Jameson, a martial arts expert. As a child, Grady saved Adam's life when he was wounded in Vietnam. After the encounter, the two never saw each other again and when Adam became a cop, he vowed to find the boy who saved his life. He eventually finds Grady and discovers that Grady's parents, who were Canadian missionaries in Vietnam, were killed and the boy was left to fend for himself. Adam gets Grady a job at a bar he owns with his friend, Malloy. Grady soon begins helping Adam on cases using the knowledge he picked up living on the streets along with his martial arts training.

Street Justice - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 1991-09-29

Street Justice - Justice - Netflix

Justice is the legal or philosophical theory by which fairness is administered. As with most philosophically-driven disciplines, the concept of justice differs in every culture. An early theory of justice was set out by the Ancient Greek philosopher Plato in his work The Republic. Advocates of divine command theory say that justice issues from God. In the 17th century, theorists like John Locke advocated natural rights as a derivative of justice. Thinkers in the social contract tradition state that justice is derived from the mutual agreement of everyone concerned. In the 19th century, utilitarian thinkers including John Stuart Mill said that justice is what has the best consequences. Theories of distributive justice concern what is distributed, between whom they are to be distributed, and what is the proper distribution. Egalitarians state that justice can only exist within the coordinates of equality. John Rawls used a theory of social contract to show that justice, and especially distributive justice, is a form of fairness. Property rights theorists (like Robert Nozick) take a deontological view of distributive justice and state that property rights-based justice maximizes the overall wealth of an economic system. Theories of retributive justice are concerned with punishment for wrongdoing. Restorative justice (also sometimes called “reparative justice”) is an approach to justice that focuses on restoring what is good, and necessarily focuses on the needs of victims and offenders.

Street Justice - Mixed theories - Netflix

Some modern philosophers have argued that Utilitarian and Retributive theories are not mutually exclusive. For example, Andrew von Hirsch, in his 1976 book Doing Justice, suggested that we have a moral obligation to punish greater crimes more than lesser ones. However, so long as we adhere to that constraint then utilitarian ideals would play a significant secondary role.

Street Justice - References - Netflix