Sniper Lee Ho Yeung (Michael Tse) left the Special Duties Unit as he failed in an operation, and since then he has gradually developed personal enmity towards his co-worker and good friend Ko Chun Kin (Eddie Cheung).

Ho Yeung becomes a yacht merchant and then becomes a president of a Firearms Association, colluding with organised crime syndicates on the sly. Taking advantage of the trust laid upon him by a detective of the Organised Crime and Triad Bureau, Seung Koon Ming Chu (Kate Tsui), he has quite a grasp on police operations that raid on the crime syndicates. On top of that, with his girlfriend Lai Chan (Eliza Sam) being a member of the Special Duties Unit, Ho Yeung gains first-move advantage in all respects. On the flip side, Chun Kin has been kept in the dark for the whole time, until he finds there is something suspicious regarding the criminal's modus operandi in several murder cases. Later on, owing to a money laundering case, Ho Yeung deliberately approaches Chun Kin's good friend, Wong Yeuk Ling (Kathy Chow), who learns that Chun Kin was the sniper who shot her in the head many years ago. Without anyone noticing, a tense standoff between the brothers is about to unfold.

Sniper Standoff - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Chinese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 45 minutes

Premier: 2013-09-09

Sniper Standoff - Bundy standoff - Netflix

The 2014 Bundy standoff was an armed confrontation between supporters of cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and law enforcement following a 21-year legal dispute in which the United States Bureau of Land Management (BLM) obtained court orders directing Bundy to pay over $1 million in withheld grazing fees for Bundy's use of federally-owned land adjacent to Bundy's ranch in southeastern Nevada. The ongoing dispute started in 1993, when, in protest against changes in grazing rules, Bundy declined to renew his permit for cattle grazing on BLM-administered public lands near Bunkerville, Nevada. According to Bundy, the federal government lacks the constitutional authority to own vast tracts of lands, an argument repeatedly rejected by federal courts. According to the BLM, Bundy continued to graze his cattle on public lands without a permit. In 1998, Bundy was prohibited by the United States District Court for the District of Nevada from grazing his cattle on an area of land later called the Bunkerville Allotment. In July 2013, federal judge Lloyd D. George ordered Bundy to refrain from trespassing on federally administered land in the Gold Butte area of Clark County. On March 27, 2014, 145,604 acres of federal land in Clark County were temporarily closed for the “capture, impound, and removal of trespass cattle.” BLM officials and law enforcement rangers began a roundup of such livestock on April 5, and Cliven Bundy’s son, Dave, was arrested. On April 12, 2014, a group of protesters, some of them armed, approached the BLM “cattle gather”. Sheriff Doug Gillespie negotiated with Bundy and newly-confirmed BLM director Neil Kornze, who elected to release the cattle and de-escalate the situation. As of the end of 2015, Cliven Bundy continued to graze his cattle on federal land and still had not paid the grazing fees. On February 10, 2016, Cliven Bundy traveled to Portland, Oregon, in response to federal law enforcement moving to end a standoff led by his sons Ammon and Ryan at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. He was arrested at the airport by the FBI and was incarcerated at the Multnomah County Jail. He was indicted for 16 federal felonies on February 17, along with Ammon and Ryan Bundy, militia leader Ryan Payne, and broadcaster Peter Santilli, who were already under arrest for their role in the Malheur standoff. Another 14 individuals were charged on March 3, 2016. Santilli subsequently pled guilty to felony conspiracy to injure or impede a federal officer. On January 8, 2018, U.S. District Judge Gloria Navarro in Las Vegas dismissed with prejudice the criminal charges against Cliven Bundy, his sons Ammon and Ryan, and co-defendant Ryan Payne regarding the standoff. Cliven and Ammon Bundy, and their supporters, have claimed that the federal government lacks the authority to manage public lands. These arguments have been repeatedly rejected by legal scholars and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court; the property clause of the United States Constitution grants plenary authority to Congress to manage federal property, including land.

Sniper Standoff - Unmet demands to disarm federal agents and destroy entrance stations - Netflix

After the BLM announced that it would release the gathered cattle, Bundy demanded that the county sheriff disarm the National Park Service “at Lake Mead and Red Rock park and all other parks where the federal government claims they have jurisdiction over.” He requested that the arms be delivered within one hour. Bundy further demanded that county bulldozers or loaders be used to “tear down that entrance places where they ticket us and where they injure us and make us citizens pay their fees.” The demands, which he described as a “mandate from we the people”, were not met. Bundy made similar statements two days later when he appeared on Glenn Beck's radio show and the Fox News program Hannity. He reiterated the demands on Sean Hannity's program: “The demand on the sheriff was de-arm the Park Service rangers, and de-arm Red Rock rangers — that's two parks very close to the Lake Mead area. And then the demand was, tear down the toll booth shacks.” After expressing disappointment that the demands had not been met, he requested to “every county sheriff across the United States” that they “disarm the federal bureaucrats.” Bundy is reported to have described these demands as “a revelation that I received.” According to Esquire, Bundy told a crowd, “The good Lord said, 'Bundy, it's not your job, it's their job.' ... This morning, I said a prayer, and this is what I received. I heard a voice say, 'Sheriff Gillespie, your work is not done. Every sheriff across the United States, take the guns away from the United States bureaucrats.”

Sniper Standoff - References - Netflix