Snatchers is about Sara, a status-obsessed high school student, who, to preserve her social standing, has sex for the first time and unexpectedly wakes up pregnant...really pregnant. Things take an interesting turn the morning after she loses her virginity when she quickly discovers she's pregnant with an alien baby screaming to get out. Now she'll have to team up with her nerdy ex-best friend Hayley to fight against an extraterrestrial threat, and hopefully keep her mom and friends from finding out about her alien offspring.

Snatchers - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: None minutes

Premier: 2017-06-22

Snatchers - Body Snatchers (1993 film) - Netflix

Body Snatchers is a 1993 American science fiction horror film directed by Abel Ferrara and starring Gabrielle Anwar, Billy Wirth, Terry Kinney, Meg Tilly, Christine Elise, R. Lee Ermey and Forest Whitaker. It is loosely based on the 1955 novel The Body Snatchers by Jack Finney. Body Snatchers is the third film adaptation of Finney's novel, the first being Invasion of the Body Snatchers in 1956, followed by a remake of the same name in 1978. The plot revolves around the discovery that people working at a military base in Alabama are being replaced by perfect physical imitations grown from plant-like pods. The duplicates are indistinguishable from normal people except for their utter lack of emotion.

Snatchers - Background info - Netflix

Warner Brothers released Body Snatchers to only a few dozen theaters, and consequently its domestic gross was a mere $428,868. The film marked director Ferrara's first venture into the science fiction genre. Producer Robert H. Solo had already produced its 1978 predecessor Invasion of the Body Snatchers. The largest difference in this version of the story is that it takes place on an Army base in Alabama, unlike a small California town in the original novel and the first adaptation filmed in 1956, or in San Francisco like in the 1978 remake. While the first two films portrayed the tightly organised, conformist “pod society” invading a free civil society, Ferrara's film, according to Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert, made a connection between “the Army's code of rigid conformity, and the behavior of the pod people, who seem like a logical extension of the same code”. Body Snatchers is the film which departs the farthest from the original novel, compared to the 1956 and 1978 versions. While Steve Malone, like the doctors Bennell in the earlier films, also has a medical/scientific profession, the main character in this film is his daughter Marti. The character of Becky/Elizabeth (Bennell's love interest and his companion during his escape attempt from the invaders) is dropped completely, as are Bennell's acquaintances and later antagonists Dr. Kaufman/Kibner and the Belicecs. Re-invented, however, are two elements which had been dropped from the 1978 version: A young boy (named Jimmy Grimaldi in the 1956 version, here Marti's half brother Andy) claims that his mother is not his “real” mother. Also, the film features a voice-over narration by the main character. Two ideas invented by the 1978 version are picked up here again: The mortal remains of the “original” human beings are picked up by garbage trucks, and the duplicates utter an outworldly scream when they discover a genuine human, thereby calling assistance from other pod people.

Snatchers - References - Netflix