Based on a popular line of greeting cards, the Shirt Tales were a group of adorable animals whose shirts would randomly proclaim things such as "Hug me" or "Let's go!," usually hinting at the current mood of the various "Tales." The group consisted of leader Tyg the tiger, Rick the raccoon, panda named Pammy, Digger the mole and a monkey called Bogey. In the second season, another female character was added, young Kip the kangaroo. The group lives in an oak tree in the middle of a public park, under the watchful eye of Superintendent Dinkle. Hardly a group of loiterers, the Shirt Tails help park visitors through acts of goodwill and their uncanny ability to solve mysteries.

Shirt Tales - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 1982-09-18

Shirt Tales - Dragon Tales - Netflix

Dragon Tales is a Canadian–American animated pre-school fantasy adventure children's television series created by Jim Coane and Ron Rodecker and developed by Coane, Wesley Eure, Jeffrey Scott, Cliff Ruby and Elana Lesser. The story focuses on the adventures of two siblings, Emmy and Max, and their dragon friends Ord, Cassie, Zak, Wheezie, and Quetzal. The series began broadcasting on PBS on their PBS Kids block on September 6, 1999, with its final episode airing on November 25, 2005. After the series ended, reruns remained on PBS and Sprout until August 31, 2010.

Shirt Tales - Origin - Netflix

Dragon Tales is based on the characters created in 1978 by Laguna Beach, California artist and retired educator Ron Rodecker, Rodecker was recovering from a coronary artery bypass graft when he began sketching dragons as a means of symbolizing forces in life that were too big to control. In 1997, Jim Coane, then a producer at Columbia TriStar Television, founded the artwork and developed it into a television series with several writers. The project was considered something of a risky venture, because it was not based on a well-known franchise like many children's television programs, such as Arthur or Paddington Bear. The series was originally shopped to PBS member stations in 1995 at the suggestion of PBS, but all passed at the time. In October 1995, Jim Coane met Marjorie Kalins, senior VP of programming and production at Children's Television Workshop, and showed her the idea for the series. Kalins, loving the idea, brought the series to Children's Television Workshop, who agreed to a partnership with the Columbia TriStar Television Group. Kalins helped him and Columbia TriStar Television obtain a grant from the Department of Education and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. The grant proposal was written by Wesley Eure. As Columbia TriStar was the TV division of two major Hollywood film studios, which in turn were owned by Sony Pictures Entertainment, Dragon Tales became one of the few PBS Kids and Sprout programs to be co-produced by a major Hollywood studio's TV subsidiary. The other PBS shows made by a major Hollywood studio were Bill Nye the Science Guy (made by Walt Disney Television) and Curious George (produced by Universal Television) In 2002, C-T was renamed to Sony Pictures Television, a company that would co-produce the third season of the program. After a tour of the lot of Sony Studios, Wesley Eure created the first treatment of the show, including the initial conception of the two-headed dragon Zak and Wheezie, who were created as “Snarf and Bugger.” The series received a massive multi-million dollar grant from the federal government, beating out The Muppets and Sesame Street for the request. As part of the conditions for the grant, Eure was required to create a companion series for the program, which he titled Show and Tell Me, based on his own lecture series known as “Anyone Can Write a Book.” Though the companion series was never actually created, Eure remains hopeful that it will one day be produced. Eure's name was not included in the initial credits for the series, forcing him to hire an attorney to ensure that he received credit. Following the development of a show bible by Jeffrey Scott, with some tweaks by writers Cliff Ruby and Elana Lesser, the series was ordered for just over 60 eleven-minute episodes by PBS. Scott was assigned to write and edit half, with Ruby/Lesser assigned to the other half. At this point, the writing team was provided with a document titled “FUN AND LEARNING IN DRAGON LAND: A Writer’s Guide to Dragon Tales Educational Content” which provided directives as to which curriculum should be included within the stories, such as “emotional challenges > understanding other people’s emotions > recognizing and labeling feelings in others” and the statement that “CURRICULUM IS PARAMOUNT!” After the creation of the first script, all writing parties involved agreed that the scripts “weren’t fun or funny, they were flat and boring.” The writers successfully explained to the consultants, educators and psychologists of PBS that children watch television to be entertained and must be entertained in order to be educated. They were then provided with a new directive, “Come up with entertaining stories and shoehorn in the curriculum wherever it fits!” Scott states that from the experience he learned an invaluable lesson about how to create a successful preschool series.

Shirt Tales - References - Netflix