Documentary following the men and women of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI).

Saving Lives at Sea - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2016-07-13

Saving Lives at Sea - Saving Private Ryan - Netflix

Saving Private Ryan is a 1998 American epic war film directed by Steven Spielberg and written by Robert Rodat. Set during the Invasion of Normandy in World War II, the film is notable for its graphic portrayal of war, and for the intensity of its opening 27 minutes, which includes a depiction of the Omaha Beach assault during the Normandy landings. It follows United States Army Rangers Captain John H. Miller (Tom Hanks) and a squad (Tom Sizemore, Edward Burns, Barry Pepper, Giovanni Ribisi, Vin Diesel, Adam Goldberg, and Jeremy Davies) as they search for a paratrooper, Private First Class James Francis Ryan (Matt Damon), who is the last-surviving brother of four servicemen. The film was a significant critical and commercial success, grossing $216.8 million domestically, making it the highest-grossing film of 1998 in the United States, and $481.8 million worldwide, making it the second-highest-grossing film of 1998 worldwide. The film was nominated for 11 Academy Awards, including Best Picture; Spielberg's direction won his second Academy Award for Best Director, with four more awards going to the film. Saving Private Ryan was released on home video in May 1999, earning another $44 million from sales. In 2014, the film was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress, being deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Saving Lives at Sea - Critical response - Netflix

The film received critical acclaim and has a 'certified fresh' rating of 92% on Rotten Tomatoes based on 132 reviews with an average score of 8.6 out of 10. The consensus states “Anchored by another winning performance from Hanks, Spielberg's unflinchingly realistic war film virtually redefines the genre.” The film also has a score of 90 out of 100 on Metacritic based on 35 critic reviews indicating “universal acclaim”. Much of the praise went for the realistic battle scenes and the actors' performances. However, it did earn some criticism for ignoring the contributions of several other countries to the D-Day landings in general and at Omaha Beach specifically. The most direct example of the latter is that during the actual landing the 2nd Rangers disembarked from British ships and were taken to Omaha Beach by Royal Navy landing craft (LCAs). The film depicts them as being United States Coast Guard-crewed craft (LCVPs and LCMs) from an American ship, the USS Thomas Jefferson (APA-30). This criticism was far from universal with other critics recognizing the director's intent to make an “American” film. The film was not released in Malaysia after Spielberg refused to cut the violent scenes; however, the film was finally released there on DVD with an 18SG certificate much later in 2005. Many critics associations, such as New York Film Critics Circle and Los Angeles Film Critics Association, chose Saving Private Ryan as Film of the Year. Roger Ebert gave it four stars out of four and called it “a powerful experience”. Filmmaker Robert Altman wrote a letter to Spielberg stating, “Private Ryan was awesome -- best I've seen.” Filmmaker Quentin Tarantino has expressed admiration for the film and has cited it as an influence on his 2009 film, Inglourious Basterds. Many World War II veterans stated that the film was the most realistic depiction of combat they had ever seen. The film was so realistic that combat veterans of D-Day and Vietnam left theaters rather than finish watching the opening scene depicting the Normandy invasion. Their visits to posttraumatic stress disorder counselors rose in number after the film's release, and many counselors advised “'more psychologically vulnerable'” veterans to avoid watching it. The Department of Veterans Affairs set up a nationwide hotline for veterans who were affected by the film, and less than two weeks after the film was released it had already received over 170 calls. The film has gained criticism and negative reviews from some war veterans and film critics. Film director and military veteran Oliver Stone has accused the film of promoting “the worship of World War II as the good war,” and has placed it alongside films such as Gladiator and Black Hawk Down that he believes were well-made, but may have inadvertently contributed to Americans' readiness for the 2003 invasion of Iraq. In defense of the film's portrait of warfare, Brian De Palma commented, “The level of violence in something like Saving Private Ryan makes sense because Spielberg is trying to show something about the brutality of what happened.” Actor Richard Todd, who performed in The Longest Day and was amongst the first of the Allied soldiers to land in Normandy (Operation Tonga), said the film was “Rubbish. Overdone.” American academic Paul Fussell, who saw combat in France during World War II, objected to what he described as, “the way Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan, after an honest, harrowing, 15-minute opening visualizing details of the unbearable bloody mess at Omaha Beach, degenerated into a harmless, uncritical patriotic performance apparently designed to thrill 12-year-old boys during the summer bad-film season. Its genre was pure cowboys and Indians, with the virtuous cowboys of course victorious.”

Saving Lives at Sea - References - Netflix