This show is a fast-paced magazine-format fishing show featuring the most elite Pro Team in the fishing industry. Pro Team Journal by Strike King includes such anglers as Kevin VanDam, Denny Brauer, Mark Davis, Shaw Grigsby, Mike Wurm, Chad Brauer, and George Cochran, among others. Each episode features multiple pros with multiple segments connected to a central theme. Several industry personnel are featured either within the body of the show or in special instructional segments teaching about their products and techniques.

Pro Team Journal by Strike King - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2004-01-03

Pro Team Journal by Strike King - Saudi Arabian-led intervention in Yemen - Netflix

A military intervention was launched by Saudi Arabia in 2015, leading a coalition of nine African and Middle East countries, to influence the outcome of the Yemeni Civil War in favour of the government of President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi. Code-named Operation Decisive Storm (Arabic: عملية عاصفة الحزم‎ 'Amaliyyat 'Āṣifat al-Ḥazm), the intervention initially consisted of a bombing campaign on Houthi Rebels and later saw a naval blockade and the deployment of ground forces into Yemen. The Saudi-led coalition has attacked the positions of the Houthi militia and loyalists of the former President of Yemen, Ali Abdullah Saleh, allegedly supported by Iran (see Iran–Saudi Arabia proxy conflict), in response to a request from the internationally recognized but domestically contested government of President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi after he fled to Saudi Arabia. The Houthis say that they took power through a popular revolt and are defending Yemen from invasion. Fighter jets and ground forces from Egypt, Morocco, Jordan, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, and Academi (formerly Blackwater) mercenaries also took part in the operation. Djibouti, Eritrea and Somalia, made their airspace, territorial waters and military bases available to the coalition. The United States provided intelligence and logistical support, including aerial refueling and search-and-rescue for downed coalition pilots. It also accelerated the sale of weapons to coalition states. The US and Britain have deployed their military personnel in the command and control centre responsible for Saudi-led air strikes on Yemen, having access to lists of targets. Pakistan was called on by Saudi Arabia to join the coalition, but its parliament voted to maintain neutrality. On 21 April 2015, the Saudi-led military coalition announced an end to Operation Decisive Storm, saying the intervention's focus would “shift from military operations to the political process”. The kingdom and its coalition partners said they would be launching political and peace efforts, which they called Operation Restoring Hope (Arabic: عملية إعادة الأمل‎ 'Amaliyyat 'I'ādat al-'Amal). However, the coalition did not rule out using force, saying it would respond to threats and prevent Houthi militants from operating within Yemen. Qatar was suspended from the coalition due to the 2017 Qatar diplomatic crisis. The war has received widespread criticism and had a dramatic worsening effect on the humanitarian situation, that reached the level of a “humanitarian disaster” or “humanitarian catastrophe”. After the Saudi-led coalition declared the entire Saada Governorate a military target, the UN's Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen and Human Rights Watch said that air strikes by the Saudi-led coalition on Saada city in Yemen were in breach of international law. On 1 July UN declared for Yemen a “level-three” emergency – the highest UN emergency level – for a period of six months. Human rights groups repeatedly blamed the Saudi-led military coalition for killing civilians and destroying health centers and other infrastructure with airstrikes. The de facto blockade left 78% (20 million) of the Yemeni population in urgent need of food, water and medical aid. Aid ships are allowed, but the bulk of commercial shipping, on which the country relies, is blocked. In one incident, coalition jets prevented an Iranian Red Crescent plane from landing by bombing Sana'a International Airport's runway, which blocked aid delivery by air. As of 10 December, more than 2,500,000 people had been internally displaced by the fighting. Many countries evacuated more than 23,000 foreign citizens from Yemen. More than 1,000,000 people fled Yemen for Saudi Arabia, Djibouti, Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan and Oman. The war has caused a humanitarian crisis, including a famine which has threatened over 17 million people, as well as an outbreak of cholera which has infected hundreds of thousands.

Pro Team Journal by Strike King - Airstrikes - Netflix

At the operation's announcement, coalition leadership stressed that their campaign would attempt a political solution and that they would continue the air and naval blockade. However, airstrikes resumed almost immediately following the coalition's announcement of the end of Operation Decisive Storm. On 22 April airstrikes continued in Taiz, where an army base was hit shortly after Houthi fighters took it over, and Aden, where an airstrike targeted Houthi tanks moving into a contested district, among other locations, such as Al Hudaydah and Ibb. The Houthis continued to fight for territory, with a Houthi spokesman saying the group would be prepared for peace talks on the condition of “a complete halt of attacks”. The previous round of UN-sponsored talks collapsed after Houthi rebels attacked Hadi's residence in Sana'a. By 26 April, coalition forces were striking what they described as Houthi military targets in Sana'a and Aden and in other locations, notably in Sa'ada province near the Saudi border, nearly every night. On 26 April, after midnight, airstrikes struck Houthi and pro-Saleh positions and targets in and around Sana'a, Aden, and the Ma'rib and Ad Dali' governorates, backing up anti-Houthi fighters in the latter three locations, with more than 90 rebels reportedly killed. Coalition warships shelled fighters near Aden's commercial port. Saudi warplanes also targeted Houthis in the Sa'dah Governorate, while Saudi artillery fired on targets in the Hajjah Governorate along the border. The Saudi National Guard was deployed on the border. On 28 April, Sana'a International Airport was bombed by Saudi F-15 fighters to prevent an Iranian plane belonging to Iranian Red Crescent Society (IRCS) from landing, while it was approaching to land. The fighters had warned the plane to turn back, in an unsuccessful attempt to thwart its landing, but the Iranian pilot ignored the “illegal warnings”, saying that, on the basis of international law, his plane did not need further permission to land. On the night of 6 May 2015, the Saudi-led coalition carried out 130 airstrikes in Yemen in a 24-hour period. At first, coalition spokesperson Ahmed Asiri admitted that schools and hospitals were targeted but claimed that these were used as weapon storage sites. Asiri later claimed that his words had been mistranslated. The United Nations humanitarian coordinator for Yemen Johannes Van Der Klaauw said that these bombings constituted a war crime. “The indiscriminate bombing of populated areas, with or without prior warning, is a contravention international humanitarian law,” he said. He continued to say that he was particularly concerned about airstrikes on Saada “where scores of civilians were reportedly killed and thousands were forced to flee their homes after the coalition declared the entire governate a military target”.

The Iranian Foreign Ministry summoned the Saudi chargé d'affaires, and the Iranian Parliament and the Iranian Red Crescent Society blasted Saudi Arabia for blocking Iranian humanitarian aid. The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) “strongly urged” the coalition to stop targeting airports and seaports so that aid could reach all Yemenis. ICRC and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) said they were extremely concerned about damage to the airports at Sanaa and the port city of Hodeidah. Overnight on 29 and 30 April, SA was reported to have airdropped arms to anti-Houthi fighters in Taiz. Later in the day, the Houthi's announced the death of 1 soldier due to airstrikes on the local police station in Al Bayda, Yemen. On 30 April airstrikes hit five provinces. New airstrikes hit SIA, completely halting aid deliveries. Intense airstrikes on the Al Amar area of the As Safra District killed 1 Yemeni soldier and injured 6 others. Source also reported that there were several airstrikes on farms and buildings in the Sahar District.

On 6 May coalition airstrikes targeted the Police Training Center in the Dhamar Governorate, damaging nearby houses meanwhile the civil aviation authority announced it would re-open the airport to receive aid. Coalition airstrikes targeted the houses of Saleh in Sana'a in the early hours of 10 May, eyewitnesses said. Khabar, a Yemeni news agency allied with Saleh said that the former president and his family were unharmed. The Moroccan government said on 10 May that one of its General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft taking part in the air campaign went missing in action over Yemen, along with its pilot. The Houthis claimed responsibility, with Yemeni state TV broadcasting a report on the jet being downed by tribal militias over the Sa'dah Governorate and showing images of the wreckage. On 18 May Saudi-led airstrikes reportedly resumed on Houthi positions after a humanitarian ceasefire expired late on Sunday. Three coalition airstrikes hit Sa'ada on Monday. Yemen's exiled Foreign Minister Riyadh Yassin blamed the rebel group for the renewal of hostilities. Al-Arabiya said Saudi forces shelled Houthi outposts along Yemen's northern border after the fighters fired mortars at a Saudi army post in Najran province. On 23 May OCHA reported that airstrikes continued in the northern governorates of Sa'ada (Baqim, Haydan, Saqayn and As Safra) and Hajjah (Abs, Hayran, Haradh, Huth, Kuhlan Affar and Sahar districts). The road connecting Haradh and Huth districts was reportedly hit. Airstrikes were also reported in Al Jawf Governorate (Bart Al Anan district). On 27 May airstrikes hit a police station in the capital, Sana'a, killing 45 officers. The Houthi-controlled Ministry of Health announced that in total, 96 people were killed. On 3 June the residence of a Houthi leader in Ibb province was hit by an airstrike, according to eyewitnesses.

On 12 June Saudi jets bombed the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Sana'a Old City, killing at least six people and destroying some of the ancient buildings. UNESCO Director General Irina Bokova said in a statement that she is “profoundly distressed by the loss of human lives as well as by damage inflicted on one of the world's oldest jewels of Islamic urban landscape”. Locals also condemned the action. On 23 September 2015, the Saudi-led coalition destroyed a ceramics factory in the town of Matnah. One civilian was killed and others were wounded. According to the BBC, the bomb is believed to have been produced in the United Kingdom by GEC-Marconi Dynamics. The factory's owner Ghalib al-Sawary told the BBC: “We built it over 20 years but to destroy it took only twenty minutes.” Campaigners say this attack was a violation of the laws of war. On 26 October 2015 Médecins Sans Frontières reported that a coalition airstrike had completely destroyed a hospital they ran in Saada province's Haydan governorate, including the operating room. When the first strike hit an unused part of the hospital the facility was completely evacuated, so there were no direct casualties. However, a spokesman for the coalition forces, Brig-Gen Ahmed al-Asiri, disclaimed responsibility for the attack. “With the hospital destroyed, at least 200,000 people now have no access to lifesaving medical care,” MSF said. “This attack is another illustration of a complete disregard for civilians in Yemen, where bombings have become a daily routine,” said Hassan Boucenine, MSF head of mission in Yemen. The GPS coordinates of the only hospital in the Haydan district were regularly shared with the Saudi-led coalition, and the roof of the facility was clearly identified with the MSF logo, he said. UNICEF said the hospital in Saada was the 39th health center hit in Yemen since March, when the violence escalated. “More children in Yemen may well die from a lack of medicines and healthcare than from bullets and bombs,” its executive director Anthony Lake said in a statement. He added that critical shortages of fuel, medication, electricity and water could mean many more will close. Amnesty International said the strike may amount to a war crime and called for an independent investigation. In February 2016, the Saudis bombed the ancient citadel of Kawkaban, killing seven civilians. On 8 October 2016, Saudi-led airstrikes targeted a hall in Sana'a where a funeral was taking place. At least 140 people were killed and about 600 were wounded. According to The Independent, one rescuer said: “The place has been turned into a lake of blood.” After initially denying it was behind the attack, the Coalition's Joint Incidents Assessment Team admitted that it had bombed the hall but claimed that this attack had been a mistake caused by bad information. After this attack, US national security spokesperson said that the US government was “deeply disturbed” by the bombing and added that US support for the Saudi-led coalition was “not a blank cheque”. He added “we have initiated an immediate review of our already significantly reduced support to the Saudi-led Coalition.” The United Nations humanitarian co-ordinator in Yemen Jamie McGoldrick said he was “shocked and outraged” by the “horrific” bombing. “This violence against civilians in Yemen must stop,” he said. On the night of 15 February 2017, the Saudi-led coalition bombed a funeral reception near Sanaa. Initial reports suggest the bombing killed nine women and one child with ten more women reported wounded. “People heard the sound of planes and started running from the house but then the bombs hit the house directly. The roof collapsed and there was blood was everywhere,” a resident of the village told a Reuters news agency cameraman.

Pro Team Journal by Strike King - References - Netflix