Based on the Postal comic series by Matt Hawkins (Think Tank) and Bryan Hill (Broken Trinity: Pandora's Box), it centers on Eden, a unique town populated and run by fugitive criminals. In Eden, everyone has a secret past, but they come here for a second chance, redemption and the opportunity to be someone new…until their pasts come back to haunt them.

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: None

Postal - Postcodes in the United Kingdom - Netflix

Postal codes used in the United Kingdom are known as postcodes (originally postal codes). They are alphanumeric and were adopted nationally between 11 October 1959 and 1974, having been devised by the GPO (Royal Mail). A full postcode is known as a “postcode unit” and designates an area with a number of addresses or a single major delivery point. Postcodes have been adopted for a wide range of purposes in addition to aiding the sorting of the mail: for calculating insurance premiums, designating destinations in route planning software and as the lowest level of aggregation in census enumeration. The boundaries of each postcode unit and within these the full address data of currently about 29 million addresses (delivery points) are stored, maintained and periodically updated in the Postcode Address File database. The initial system of named postal districts, developed in London and other large cities from 1857, evolved towards the present form: in 1917 London was split into broad numbered subdivisions, and this extended to the other cities in 1934. After the reorganisation of London in the 1960s, many parts of the city now lie outside the traditional postcode zone. This includes, but is not limited to, large parts of the “TW” “KT” “SM” “CR” “HA” and “UB” postcode areas, among a few others. The structure of a postcode is a one or two-letter postcode area code named after a local city, town or area of London, one or two digits signifying a district in that region, a space, and then an arbitrary code of one number and two letters. For example, the postcode of the University of Roehampton in London is SW15 5PU, where SW stands for south-west London. The postcode of GCHQ is GL51 0EX, where GL signifies the postal area of Gloucester. The postal town refers to a wide area and does not relate to a specific town, county or region. GL51 is one of the postcodes for the town of Cheltenham (in Gloucestershire) which is where GCHQ is located.

Postal - Other large towns - Netflix

Following the successful introduction of postal districts in London, the system was extended to other large towns and cities. Liverpool was divided into Eastern, Northern, Southern and Western districts in 1864/65, and Manchester and Salford into eight numbered districts in 1867/68. In 1917 Dublin – then still part of the United Kingdom – was divided into numbered postal districts. These continue in use in a modified form by An Post, the postal service of the Republic of Ireland. In 1923 Glasgow was divided in a similar way to London, with numbered districts preceded by a letter denoting the compass point (C, W, NW, N, E, S, SW, SE). In January 1932 the Postmaster General approved the designation of some predominantly urban areas into numbered districts. In November 1934 the Post Office announced the introduction of numbered districts (short postal codes) in “every provincial town in the United Kingdom large enough to justify it”. Pamphlets were issued to each householder and business in ten areas notifying them of the number of the district in which their premises lay. The pamphlets included a map of the districts, and copies were made available at local head post offices. The public were “particularly invited” to include the district number in the address at the head of letters. A publicity campaign in the following year encouraged the use of the district numbers. The slogan for the campaign was “For speed and certainty always use a postal district number on your letters and notepaper”. A poster was fixed to every pillar box in the affected areas bearing the number of the district and appealing for the public's co-operation. Every post office in the numbered district was also to display this information. Printers of Christmas cards and stationery were requested to always include district numbers in addresses, and election agents for candidates in the upcoming general election were asked to ensure they correctly addressed the 100 million items of mail they were expected to post. Businesses were issued with a free booklet containing maps and listings of the correct district number for every street in the ten areas. The ten areas were: Birmingham Brighton/Hove Bristol Edinburgh Glasgow Leeds/Bradford Liverpool Manchester/Salford Newcastle upon Tyne Sheffield For example, Toxteth was Liverpool 8. A single numbering sequence was shared by Manchester and Salford: letters would be addressed to Manchester 1 or Salford 7 (lowest digits, respectively). Some Birmingham codes were sub-divided with a letter, such as Great Barr, Birmingham 22 or Birmingham 22a, as can still be seen on many older street-name signs.

Postal - References - Netflix