Four outlaws in the Old West are hunted down by their former leader, Sheriff Jonathan Grail. Grail corners them at an old Indian cemetery, and a bolt of lightning strikes the five men... transporting them forward a hundred years in time to 1986. Forced to band together, the five men adapt to modern times as best they can and start a company, the Double-Eagle Detective Agency. Helping them is Maggie Randall, a local police officer.

Outlaws - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 1986-12-28

Outlaws - Outlaw - Netflix

In historical legal systems, an outlaw is declared as outside the protection of the law. In pre-modern societies, the criminal is withdrawn all legal protection, so that anyone is legally empowered to persecute or kill them. Outlawry was thus one of the harshest penalties in the legal system. In early Germanic law, the death penalty is conspicuously absent, and outlawing is the most extreme punishment, presumably amounting to a death sentence in practice. The concept is known from Roman law, as the status of homo sacer, and persisted throughout the Middle Ages. In the common law of England, a “Writ of Outlawry” made the pronouncement Caput lupinum (“Let his be a wolf's head”, literally “May he bear a wolfish head”) with respect to its subject, using “head” to refer to the entire person (cf. “per capita”) and equating that person with a wolf ( warg ) in the eyes of the law : Not only was the subject deprived of all legal rights of the law being outside the “law”, but others could kill him on sight as if he were a wolf or other wild animal. Women were declared “waived” rather than outlawed but it was effectively the same punishment.

Outlaws - Popular usage - Netflix

Though the judgment of outlawry is now obsolete (even though it inspired the pro forma Outlawries Bill which is still to this day introduced in the British House of Commons during the State Opening of Parliament), romanticised outlaws became stock characters in several fictional settings. This was particularly so in the United States, where outlaws were popular subjects of newspaper coverage and stories in the 19th century, and 20th century fiction and Western movies. Thus, “outlaw” is still commonly used to mean those violating the law or, by extension, those living that lifestyle, whether actual criminals evading the law or those merely opposed to “law-and-order” notions of conformity and authority (such as the “outlaw country” music movement in the 1970s).

Outlaws - References - Netflix