Drivers, celebrities and legends of the sport will take the stage during the induction of the seventh NASCAR Hall of Fame class. Prior to the ceremony, a special Commemorative Dinner at the Charlotte Convention Center, which adjoins the NASCAR Hall of Fame, will feature the annual inductee jacket presentation and Squier-Hall Award for NASCAR Media Excellence presentation. Fans can purchase a seat for the dinner that places a NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver at their table (limited quantities are available). After dinner, the Induction Ceremony will take place in the Crown Ballroom at the Charlotte Convention Center and be broadcast live on NBCSN. The recipient of the Landmark Award for Outstanding Contributions to NASCAR will also be recognized at the ceremony.

NASCAR Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony - Netflix

Type: Award Show

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 120 minutes

Premier: 2010-05-23

NASCAR Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony - David Pearson (racing driver) - Netflix

David Gene Pearson (born December 22, 1934) is a former American stock car racer from Spartanburg, South Carolina. Pearson began his NASCAR career in 1960 and ended his first season by winning the 1960 NASCAR Rookie of the Year award. He won three championships (1966, 1968, and 1969) every year he ran the full schedule in NASCAR's Grand National Series (now Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series). NASCAR described his 1974 season as an indication of his “consistent greatness”; that season he finished third in the season points having competed in only 19 of 30 races. At his finalist nomination for NASCAR Hall of Fame's inaugural 2010 class, NASCAR described Pearson as “... the model of NASCAR efficiency during his career. With little exaggeration, when Pearson showed up at a race track, he won.” Pearson ended his career in 1986, and currently holds the second position on NASCAR's all-time win list with 105 victories; as well as achieving 113 pole positions. Pearson was successful in different venues of racing; he won three times on road courses, 48 times on superspeedways, 54 times on Short tracks, and had 23 dirt track wins. Pearson finished with at least one Top 10 finish in each of his 27 seasons. Pearson was nicknamed the “Fox” (and later the “Silver Fox”) for his calculated approach to racing. ESPN described him as being a “plain-spoken, humble man, and that added up to very little charisma.” Pearson's career paralleled Richard Petty's, the driver who won the most races in NASCAR history. They accounted for 63 first/second-place finishes (with the edge going to Pearson). Petty said, “Pearson could beat you on a short track, he could beat you on a superspeedway, he could beat you on a road course, he could beat you on a dirt track. It didn't hurt as bad to lose to Pearson as it did to some of the others, because I knew how good he was.” Pearson said of Petty: “I always felt that if I beat him I beat the best, and I heard he said the same thing about me.”

NASCAR Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony - Personal life - Netflix

Pearson's wife Helen Ruth Pearson predeceased him in 1991. He has three sons (Larry Pearson, Ricky Pearson, and Eddie Pearson). Larry raced in NASCAR and he was the 1986 and 1987 Busch Series champion. Ricky Pearson was general manager and a crew chief for Buckshot Jones/Buckshot Racing when they won two Busch Series races. In December 2014 Pearson suffered a mild stroke which partially paralyzed the left half of his body, but from which he recovered.

NASCAR Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony - References - Netflix