MST3K started as a cable show in Minnesota, but soon grew in popularity. It moved to Comedy Central (originally the Comedy Channel), and then to Syfy.

The series initially features a pair of mad scientists working at Gizmonic Institutes shooting a worker into space to their Satellite of Love. First Joel, and then Mike, are forced to watch cheesy movies. Joel builds robots to keep him company, and Crow T. Robot and Tom Servo accompany him into the theater. There they make fun of the movies to keep their sanity. Scattered throughout are live-action sketches and scenes with the Mads back on Earth.

In later seasons, cast changes force the departure of the scientists. One scientist's mother, Pearl Forrester, takes over the experiments.

Mystery Science Theater 3000 - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 120 minutes

Premier: 1988-11-24

Mystery Science Theater 3000 - Manos: The Hands of Fate - Netflix

Manos: The Hands of Fate is a 1966 American low-budget horror film. It was written, directed, and produced by Harold P. Warren who also starred in the film. It is widely recognized to be one of the worst films ever made. In 1993, the television comedy series Mystery Science Theater 3000 (MST3K), a show based on the premise of comedically mocking B movies, featured Manos: The Hands of Fate, helping the film develop a cult status. The film's plot revolves primarily around a vacationing family who lose their way on a road trip. After a long drive in the Texas desert, the family finds themselves trapped at a lodge maintained by a polygamous pagan cult, and they attempt to escape as the cult's members decide what to do with them. The film is infamous for its technical deficiencies, especially its significant editing and continuity flaws; its soundtrack and visuals not being synchronized; tedious pacing; abysmal acting; and several scenes that are seemingly inexplicable or disconnected from the overall plot, such as a couple making out in a car or The Master's wives breaking out in catfights. Warren was an insurance and fertilizer salesman from El Paso, Texas, who produced the film as the result of a bet. He also starred in it, alongside El Paso theater actors Tom Neyman and John Reynolds. Manos was an independent production by a crew with little or no background or experience in filmmaking and a very limited budget at its disposal. Upon its theatrical debut, the film was poorly received, playing only at the Capri Theater in El Paso and some drive-ins in West Texas and New Mexico. It remained obscure until its Mystery Science Theater appearance in 1993, which sparked two DVD releases (the original film and the three separate releases of DVDs featuring the MST3K episode of the film). The original 16 mm work print was discovered in California in 2011, from which a new copy of the film, of vastly superior visual quality, was released on Blu-ray by Synapse Films on October 13, 2015.

Mystery Science Theater 3000 - See also - Netflix

List of American films of 1966 List of films considered the worst Z movie

Mystery Science Theater 3000 - References - Netflix