Monsters of God is a post-Civil War drama set in Texas in 1867, during the Comanche Wars. In Monsters of God, savagery and violence are the cornerstones of Colonel "Terrible" Bill Lancaster's holy war against the Comanche in post-Civil War Texas. Despite the peaceful co-existence between the Comanche and local townspeople, Lancaster sets out on a quest to kill off every single member of the tribe, bringing wild chaos to the town of Slater. Meanwhile, his wife, Cynthia Lancaster, will let no one get in the way of her obsessive quest to institute her wildly feminist ideals, even if she has to challenge the United States Army and make her own allegiance with the Comanche women. Whether by force or free will, change is coming to Texas, and the escalating insanity will reveal humanity at its most monstrous.

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: None

Monsters of God - Flying Spaghetti Monster - Netflix

The Flying Spaghetti Monster (FSM) is the deity of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, or Pastafarianism. Pastafarianism (a portmanteau of pasta and Rastafarianism) is a social movement that promotes a light-hearted view of religion and opposes the teaching of intelligent design and creationism in public schools. According to adherents, Pastafarianism is a “real, legitimate religion, as much as any other”. It is legally recognized as a religion in the Netherlands and New Zealand – where Pastafarian representatives are authorized to officiate weddings. However, in the United States, a federal judge has ruled that the “Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster” is not a real religion. The “Flying Spaghetti Monster” was first described in a satirical open letter written by Bobby Henderson in 2005 to protest the Kansas State Board of Education decision to permit teaching intelligent design as an alternative to evolution in public school science classes. In the letter, Henderson demanded equal time in science classrooms for “Flying Spaghetti Monsterism”, alongside intelligent design and evolution. After Henderson published the letter on his website, the Flying Spaghetti Monster rapidly became an Internet phenomenon and a symbol of opposition to the teaching of intelligent design in public schools. Pastafarian tenets (generally satires of creationism) are presented both on Henderson's Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster website, where he is described as “prophet”, and in The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, written by Henderson in 2006. The central belief is that an invisible and undetectable Flying Spaghetti Monster created the universe. Pirates are revered as the original Pastafarians. Henderson asserts that a decline in the number of pirates over the years is the cause of global warming. The FSM community congregates at Henderson's website to share ideas about the Flying Spaghetti Monster and crafts representing images of it. Because of its popularity and exposure, the Flying Spaghetti Monster is often used as a contemporary version of Russell's teapot—an argument that the philosophic burden of proof lies upon those who make unfalsifiable claims, not on those who reject them. Pastafarianism has received praise from the scientific community and criticism from proponents of intelligent design. Pastafarians have engaged in disputes with creationists, including in Polk County, Florida, where they played a role in dissuading the local school board from adopting new rules on teaching evolution.

Monsters of God - Legal status - Netflix

National branches of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster have been striving in many countries to have FSMism become an officially (legally) recognized religion, with varying degrees of success. Pastafarianism/FSMism is recognized as a religion in the Netherlands, and New Zealand, where Pastafarian representatives have been authorized to celebrate weddings. A federal court in the US state of Nebraska ruled that Flying Spaghetti Monster is a satirical parody religion, rather than an actual religion, and as a result, Pastafarians are not entitled to religious accommodation under the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act: “This is not a question of theology”, the ruling reads in part. “The FSM Gospel is plainly a work of satire, meant to entertain while making a pointed political statement. To read it as religious doctrine would be little different from grounding a 'religious exercise' on any other work of fiction.” Pastafarians have used their claimed faith as a test case to argue for freedom of religion, and to oppose government discrimination against people who do not follow a recognized religion.

Monsters of God - References - Netflix