In "Meteor," two massive rocks -- tumbling debris older than the solar system itself -- collide in space. The course has been altered. The target is Earth. In a remote observatory, Dr. Lehman (Emmy winner Christopher Lloyd, "Back to the Future"), discovers a meteor approximately three times the size of Mount Everest barreling its way towards Earth. His devoted young assistant Imogene O'Neill (Marla Sokoloff, "The Practice") feverishly types in the coordinates only to find the previously identified meteor named Kassandra is headed their way. It's only the beginning of their troubles as showers of smaller meteorites begin to lay waste to major cities around the globe.

The impending disaster brings out the best and the worst sides in people as they cope by either lending a helping hand or taking advantage of the situation. In a small California town, a police chief (Golden Globe nominee Stacy Keach, "Prison Break") struggles to calm a panicky group of citizens. Miles away, his son Jack, a detective (Golden Globe nominee Billy Campbell, "Once and Again"), finds himself caught in the middle of the most difficult arrest of his career with the ill-timed transfer of a very dangerous psychopath named Stark (Michael Rooker, "JFK"). Then there's the skeptical Dr. Chetwyn (Emmy and Golden Globe nominee Jason Alexander, "Seinfeld") who may be the only chance Lehman and O'Neill have to get their findings to the proper authorities in time to deflect Kassandra.

Time is running out in "Meteor," in which eye-popping effects, explosive human drama, and hair-raising action combine to create a suspenseful, thrilling and dramatic new miniseries event from RHI Entertainment.

Meteor - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 120 minutes

Premier: 2009-07-12

Meteor - Meteor shower - Netflix

A meteor shower is a celestial event in which a number of meteors are observed to radiate, or originate, from one point in the night sky. These meteors are caused by streams of cosmic debris called meteoroids entering Earth's atmosphere at extremely high speeds on parallel trajectories. Most meteors are smaller than a grain of sand, so almost all of them disintegrate and never hit the Earth's surface. Intense or unusual meteor showers are known as meteor outbursts and meteor storms, which may produce greater than 1000 meteors an hour. The Meteor Data Centre lists about 600 suspected meteor showers of which about 100 are well established. Several organizations provide viewing opportunities on the Internet.

Meteor - Extraterrestrial meteor showers - Netflix

Any other solar system body with a reasonably transparent atmosphere can also have meteor showers. As the Moon is in the neighborhood of Earth it can experience the same showers, but will have its own phenomena due to its lack of an atmosphere per se, such as vastly increasing its sodium tail. NASA now maintains an ongoing database of observed impacts on the moon. maintained by the Marshall Space Flight Center whether from a shower or not. Many planets and moons have impact craters dating back large spans of time. But new craters, perhaps even related to meteor showers are possible. Mars, and thus its moons, is known to have meteor showers. These have not been observed on other planets as yet but may be presumed to exist. For Mars in particular, although these are different from the ones seen on Earth because the different orbits of Mars and Earth relative to the orbits of comets. The Martian atmosphere has less than one percent of the density of Earth's at ground level, at their upper edges, where meteoroids strike, the two are more similar. Because of the similar air pressure at altitudes for meteors, the effects are much the same. Only the relatively slower motion of the meteoroids due to increased distance from the sun should marginally decrease meteor brightness. This is somewhat balanced in that the slower descent means that Martian meteors have more time in which to ablate. On March 7, 2004, the panoramic camera on Mars Exploration Rover Spirit recorded a streak which is now believed to have been caused by a meteor from a Martian meteor shower associated with comet 114P/Wiseman-Skiff. A strong display from this shower was expected on December 20, 2007. Other showers speculated about are a “Lambda Geminid” shower associated with the Eta Aquariids of Earth (i.e., both associated with Comet 1P/Halley), a “Beta Canis Major” shower associated with Comet 13P/Olbers, and “Draconids” from 5335 Damocles. Isolated massive impacts have been observed at Jupiter: The 1994 Comet Shoemaker–Levy 9 which formed a brief trail as well, and successive events since then (see List of Jupiter events.) Meteors or meteor showers have been discussed for most of the objects in the solar system with an atmosphere: Mercury, Venus, Saturn's moon Titan, Neptune's moon Triton, and Pluto.

Meteor - References - Netflix