A brand-new, hilarious sports panel show hosted by comedian Mark Watson (‘Mock the Week', ‘Buzzcocks' and ‘Have I Got News for You' regular and full-time Bristol City fan). Mark Watson Kicks Off is a riotous, no-holds-barred celebration of ‘the Beautiful Game' and all that makes British sport great... or more specifically... quite promising, frequently over-hyped and ultimately disappointing.

Mark Watson Kicks Off - Netflix

Type: Panel Show

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2010-10-21

Mark Watson Kicks Off - Sherlock Holmes (2009 film) - Netflix

Sherlock Holmes is a 2009 mystery period action film based on the character of the same name created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The film was directed by Guy Ritchie and produced by Joel Silver, Lionel Wigram, Susan Downey, and Dan Lin. The screenplay, by Michael Robert Johnson, Anthony Peckham, and Simon Kinberg, was developed from a story by Wigram and Johnson. Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law portray Sherlock Holmes and Dr. John Watson respectively. Set in 1890, eccentric detective Holmes and his companion Watson are hired by a secret society to foil a mysticist's plot to expand the British Empire by seemingly supernatural means. Rachel McAdams stars as their former adversary Irene Adler and Mark Strong portrays villain Lord Henry Blackwood. The film was widely released in North America on December 25, 2009, and on December 26, 2009 in the UK, Ireland, the Pacific and the Atlantic. Sherlock Holmes received mostly positive critical reaction, with praise for its story, action sequences, set pieces, costume design, Hans Zimmer’s musical score, and Downey's performance as the main character, winning Downey the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy. The film was also nominated for two Academy Awards, Best Original Score and Best Art Direction. A sequel, Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, was released on December 16, 2011, with a third film scheduled for release in December 2020.

Mark Watson Kicks Off - Development - Netflix

Producer Lionel Wigram remarked that for around ten years, he had been thinking of new ways to depict Sherlock Holmes. “I realized the images I was seeing in my head [when reading the stories] were different to the images I'd seen in previous films.” He imagined “a much more modern, more bohemian character, who dresses more like an artist or a poet”, namely Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. After leaving his position as executive for Warner Bros. in 2006, Wigram sought a larger scope to the story so it could attract a large audience, and amalgamated various Holmes stories to flesh it out further. Some sequences in the movie were more than suggested by uncredited incidents found in a 1979 novel Enter the Lion: A Posthumous Memoir of Mycroft Holmes. Lord Blackwood's character was developed as a nod to Victorian interests in spiritualism and the later influence of Aleister Crowley. The producer felt he was “almost clever” pitting Holmes, who has an almost supernatural ability to solve crimes, against a supposedly supernatural villain. The plot point, moreover, nods to the Holmesian tale of The Hound of the Baskervilles, where a string of seemingly supernatural events is finally explained through intuitive reasoning and scientific savvy. Wigram wrote and John Watkiss drew a 25-page comic book about Holmes in place of a spec script. Professor Moriarty was included in the script to set up the sequels.

In March 2007, Warner Bros. chose to produce, seeing similarities in the concept with Batman Begins. Arthur Conan Doyle's estate had some involvement in sorting out legal issues, although the stories are in the public domain in the United States. Neil Marshall was set to direct, but Guy Ritchie signed on to direct in June 2008. When a child at boarding school, Ritchie and other pupils listened to the Holmes stories through dormitory loudspeakers. “Holmes used to talk me to sleep every night when I was seven years old,” he said. Therefore, his image of Holmes differed from the films. He wanted to make his film more “authentic” to Doyle, explaining, “There's quite a lot of intense action sequences in the stories, [and] sometimes that hasn't been reflected in the movies.” Holmes' “brilliance will percolate into the action”, and the film will show that his “intellect was as much of a curse as it was a blessing”. Ritchie sought to make Sherlock Holmes a “very contemporary film as far as the tone and texture”, because it has been “a relatively long time since there's been a film version that people embraced”.

Mark Watson Kicks Off - References - Netflix