Set in contemporary London with a British Metropolitan Police Officer at its heart, Marcella is Scandinavian noir on the streets of Britain. Told with Rosenfeldt's unflinchingly clear Nordic style, full of hooks and action, The series will lead the audience through a narrative maze until the final moments of the drama. Marcella will also delve into the psychology of a single female detective working solo on a serial murder case with many potential suspects and victims.

Returning to the Met's Murder Squad after a 12-year career break, Marcella is a detective in her late 30's who gave up her fast-tracked role to marry and devote her life to starting a family. With the abrupt end to her marriage to the love of her life Jason and isolated from her daughter at boarding school, Marcella returns to work whilst attempting to make sense of what's happened in her life.

By coincidence a spate of recent killings have occurred which bear the hallmarks of unsolved murders committed over a decade ago. Marcella is immediately assigned to the case she first worked on in 2003. The killer was never detected and more bodies have been discovered with the same method of killing. Has the killer re-appeared or is a copycat murderer responsible for these recent deaths? How will Marcella cope returning to duties when her own temperament is so fragile and vulnerable? Will throwing herself into her work provide the answers she's seeking? Or lead her dangerously into territory she must evade at all cost?

Marcella - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2016-04-04

Marcella - Saint Marcella - Netflix

Marcella (325–410) is a saint in the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church. She is known primarily for her role in the founding of monasticism. After the death of her husband, she commenced a life of abstinence and many other women in Rome at the time followed suit. Most of what we know about Marcella is from the letters of Saint Jerome.

Marcella - Relationship with Saint Jerome - Netflix

Summoned by Pope Damasus I (who arranged lodging at Marcella's hospitality house), Jerome arrived in Rome in 382. It was an exhilarating time for Marcella, a woman of letters who had immersed herself in both Greek and Hebrew, to be entertaining one of the great minds of the age. Jerome spent the next three years in what he called her “domestic church,” translating the Bible into Latin. She learned under his teaching even as she critiqued his translation. He spoke and wrote of her Christian devotion and scholarship and commended her influence on Pope Anastasius I — particularly in his condemning Origen's doctrines, which Jerome declared a “glorious victory.” Indeed, his admiration of Marcella was unbounded, not only for her intellectual acumen but also for her deference to men who might be threatened by her vast store of knowledge. Most of what we know about Marcella is from the letters of Jerome, most famously his letter 127 to Principia. It was written on the occasion of Marcella's death, paying tribute to her life and consoling her beloved student. In it, he says the following about his relationship with Marcella: As in those days my name was held in some renown as that of a student of the Scriptures, she never came to see me without asking me some questions about them, nor would she rest content at once, but on the contrary would dispute them; this, however, was not for the sake of argument, but to learn by questioning the answers to such objections might, as she saw, be raised. How much virtue and intellect, how much holiness and purity I found in her I am afraid to say, both lest I may exceed the bounds of men's belief and lest I may increase your sorrow by reminding you of the blessings you have lost. This only will I say, that whatever I had gathered together by long study, and by constant meditation made part of my nature, she tasted, she learned and made her own. Marcella was also known for her efforts to restrain Jerome from quarrelling with his opponents — or at least helping him control his legendary temper. Eleven of his extant letters are addressed to her, and she is mentioned in many of his other writings. In one of his letters he responded to her query about the truth of Montanism. Someone was apparently attempting to convert her, and she was deeply interested in what she is hearing, though suspecting that the claim that they possess a more authentic spirituality might have been false. Jerome writes a lengthy point-by-point refutation of the movement. It was at the home of Marcella that Jerome first met Paula, a devoted and scholarly woman who would become his long-time intellectual counterpart. When Jerome returned to the Holy Land, Paula relocated there as well. They invited Marcella to join them, but she remained in Rome to oversee her growing house of virgins, where she was addressed as Mother.

Marcella - References - Netflix