Janghwa is the woman who gets everyone's attention and love with her gorgeous appearance. She had a perfect marriage and enjoys her luxurious life. She only concerns and cares about herself, and she's not changed after she got married. Hongryeon, the deprived single mother, has a dream of having a happy family of her own, but this modest hope is not easy for her. Nevertheless, Hongryeon is an energetic and optimistic person who lives her life to the fullest. The two very contrary women confront each other, as Janghwa abandons the mother-in-law and Hongryeon starts to look after her.

Love and Obsession - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Korean

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2009-04-20

Love and Obsession - Unrequited love - Netflix

Unrequited love or one-sided love is love that is not openly reciprocated or understood as such by the beloved. The beloved may not be aware of the admirer's deep and strong romantic affection, or may consciously reject it. The Merriam Webster Online Dictionary defines unrequited as “not reciprocated or returned in kind”. Psychiatrist Eric Berne states in his book Sex in Human Loving that “Some say that one-sided love is better than none, but like half a loaf of bread, it is likely to grow hard and moldy sooner.” Others, however, like the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, considered that “indispensable...to the lover is his unrequited love, which he would at no price relinquish for a state of indifference.” It can also be contrasted with redamancy or the act of reciprocal love.

Love and Obsession - In popular culture - Netflix

Unrequited love has been a frequent subject in popular culture. Movies, books and songs often portray the would-be lover's persistence as paying off when the rejector comes to his or her senses. The presence of this script makes it easy to understand why an unrequited lover persists in the face of rejection. In the traditional Welsh folk song Cariad Cywir, the protagonist persists in unrequited love happily despite being continuously ignored. However, there have been other depictions in which the unrequited lover commits suicide, as in Goethe's early novel The Sorrows of Young Werther or in the traditional British Isles folk ballad I Once Loved a Lass. In Billy Bragg's song The Saturday Boy, the young protagonist looks up the word “unrequited” in the dictionary whilst in the state of unrequited love. “Johnny Angel”, a number one hit song by singer and actress Shelley Fabares, has a relatively notable example of unrequited love. According to the lyrics of this song, a girl falls in love with a boy who doesn't even know that she exists. She even declines countless dates with other boys, just to fully concentrate on the boy she loves. And she has dreams about what the world would be like if the boy loves her. In its sequel, “Johnny Loves Me”, also by Fabares, the girl later wins Johnny's heart, convincing him to believe that the girl does exist. The comics strip Peanuts features multiple different characters engaged in unrequited love relationships. Commenting on the abundance of unrequited love in the series, author Charles Schulz said that he did not know why there is so much unrequited love, but it is something everyone can relate to.

Love and Obsession - References - Netflix