Set in Los Angeles, the entertainment and high-profile trial capital of the world, JUSTICE centers on four brilliant lawyers who, together, tackle the cases that captivate the country and provide compelling fodder for everything from water cooler chit-chat to tabloid glossies to 24-hour news channels. Combining their unique skill sets and personal charisma with the most cutting-edge forensic technology, these lawyers are a formidable presence in any courtroom. When the stakes are as high as they can be, you want Trott, Nicholson, Tuller & Graves in your corner.

When California's most prominent residents need the best legal representation, they hire TNT&G. Even if they are convicted in the eyes of the media, led by the infotainment court show "American Crime", TNT&G mounts a defense using state-of-the-art forensic interpretation, jury consultants, mock juries, experts and masterful media spin to save their clients -- no matter what the cost.

Ultimately, each episode will conclude with the series' signature epilogue. In a flashback to the scene of the crime, we see what no lawyer can ever see: what really happened, and whether JUSTICE has been served.

Justice - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2006-08-30

Justice - Justice - Netflix

Justice is the legal or philosophical theory by which fairness is administered. As with most philosophically-driven disciplines, the concept of justice differs in every culture. An early theory of justice was set out by the Ancient Greek philosopher Plato in his work The Republic. Advocates of divine command theory say that justice issues from God. In the 17th century, theorists like John Locke advocated natural rights as a derivative of justice. Thinkers in the social contract tradition state that justice is derived from the mutual agreement of everyone concerned. In the 19th century, utilitarian thinkers including John Stuart Mill said that justice is what has the best consequences. Theories of distributive justice concern what is distributed, between whom they are to be distributed, and what is the proper distribution. Egalitarians state that justice can only exist within the coordinates of equality. John Rawls used a theory of social contract to show that justice, and especially distributive justice, is a form of fairness. Property rights theorists (like Robert Nozick) take a deontological view of distributive justice and state that property rights-based justice maximizes the overall wealth of an economic system. Theories of retributive justice are concerned with punishment for wrongdoing. Restorative justice (also sometimes called “reparative justice”) is an approach to justice that focuses on restoring what is good, and necessarily focuses on the needs of victims and offenders.

Justice - Mixed theories - Netflix

Some modern philosophers have argued that Utilitarian and Retributive theories are not mutually exclusive. For example, Andrew von Hirsch, in his 1976 book Doing Justice, suggested that we have a moral obligation to punish greater crimes more than lesser ones. However, so long as we adhere to that constraint then utilitarian ideals would play a significant secondary role.

Justice - References - Netflix