Based on the acclaimed book series by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reeves, Interworld is an adventurous tale of teenage dimension-walker Joey Harker and his quest to battle and save all people – in all possible dimensions. Everyone in the Interworld is a version of Joey, some only a little different, while others are different genders, different ages and even different species. What makes them all special is that they have the ability to "walk," or travel from dimension to dimension. This also makes them a target for the Hex and the Binary factions, who yearn to conquer more dimensions by using these "walkers" as fuel.

InterWorld - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: In Development

Runtime: None minutes

Premier: None

InterWorld - Inter Milan - Netflix

Football Club Internazionale Milano S.p.A., commonly referred to as Internazionale (pronounced [ˌinternattsjoˈnaːle]) or simply Inter and colloquially known as Inter Milan outside Italy, is a professional Italian football club based in Milan, Italy. The club has played continuously in the top tier of the Italian football league system since its debut in 1909. Inter has won 30 domestic trophies on par with its local rivals A.C. Milan, including 18 league titles, 7 Coppa Italia and 5 Supercoppa Italiana. From 2006 to 2010, the club won five successive league titles, equalling the all-time record at that time. They have won the Champions League three times: two back-to-back in 1964 and 1965 and then another in 2010. Their latest win completed an unprecedented Italian seasonal treble, with Inter winning the Coppa Italia and the Scudetto the same year. The club has also won three UEFA Cups, two Intercontinental Cups and one FIFA Club World Cup. Inter's home games are played at the San Siro stadium (cap. 80,018), also known as the Stadio Giuseppe Meazza. Shared with rivals A.C. Milan, the stadium is the largest in Italian football. The local team A.C. Milan are considered among their biggest rivals, and matches between the two teams, known as the Derby della Madonnina, are one of the most followed derbies in football. As of 2010, Inter is the second-most supported team in Italy, and the sixth most-supported team in Europe. The club is one of the most valuable in Italian and world football. It was a founding member of the now-defunct G-14 group of Europe's leading football clubs.

InterWorld - Corporate - Netflix

F.C. Internazionale Milano S.p.A. was described as one of the financial “black-holes” among the Italian clubs, which was heavily dependent on the financial contribution from the owner Massimo Moratti. In June 2006, the shirt sponsor and the minority shareholder of the club, Pirelli, sold 15.26% shares of the club to Moratti family, for €13.5 million. The tyre manufacturer retained 4.2%. However, due to several capital increases of Inter, such as a reversed merger with an intermediate holding company, Inter Capital S.r.l. in 2006, which held 89% shares of Inter and €70 million capitals at that time, or issues new shares for €70.8 million in June 2007, €99.9 million in December 2007, €86.6 million in 2008, €70 million in 2009, €40 million in 2010 and 2011, €35 million in 2012 or allowing Thoir subscribed €75 million new shares of Inter in 2013, Pirelli became the third largest shareholders of just 0.5%, as of 31 December 2015. In the prospectus of Pirelli's second IPO in 2017, the company also revealed that the value of the remaining shares the company owned, was write-off to zero in 2016 financial year. Inter also received direct capital contribution from the shareholders to cover loss which was excluded from issuing shares. (Italian: versamenti a copertura perdite) Right before the takeover of Thohir, the consolidated balance sheets of “Internazionale Holding S.r.l.” showed the whole companies group had a bank debt of €157 million, including the bank debt of a subsidiary “Inter Brand Srl”, as well as the club itself, to Istituto per il Credito Sportivo (ICS), for €15.674 million on the balance sheet at end of 2012–13 financial year. In 2006 Inter sold its brand to the new subsidiary, “Inter Brand S.r.l.”, a special purpose entity with a shares capital of €40 million, for €158 million (the deal made Internazionale make a net loss of just €31 million in a separate financial statement). At the same time the subsidiary secured a €120 million loan from Banca Antonveneta, which would be repaid in installments until 30 June 2016; La Repubblica described the deal as “doping”. In September 2011 Inter secured a loan from ICS by factoring the sponsorship of Pirelli of 2012–13 and 2013–14 season, for €24.8 million, in an interest rate of 3 months Euribor + 1.95% spread. In June 2014 new Inter Group secured €230 million loan from Goldman Sachs and UniCredit at a new interest rate of 3 months Euribor + 5.5% spread, as well as setting up a new subsidiary to be the debt carrier: “Inter Media and Communication S.r.l.”. €200 million of which would be utilized in debt refinancing of the group. The €230million loan, €1 million (plus interests) would be due on 30 June 2015, €45 million (plus interests) would be repaid in 15 installments from 30 September 2015 to 31 March 2019, as well as €184 million (plus interests) would be due on 30 June 2019. In ownership side, the Hong Kong-based International Sports Capital HK Limited, had pledged the shares of Italy-based International Sports Capital S.p.A. (the direct holding company of Inter) to CPPIB Credit Investments for €170 million in 2015, at an interest rate of 8% p.a (due March 2018) to 15% p.a. (due March 2020). ISC repaid the notes on 1 July 2016 after they sold part of the shares of Inter Milan to Suning Holdings Group. However, in the late 2016 the shares of ISC S.p.A. was pledged again by ISC HK to private equity funds of OCP Asia for US$80 million. In December 2017, the club also refinanced its debt of €300 million, by issuing corporate bond to the market, via Goldman Sachs as the bookkeeper, for an interest rate of 4.875% p.a. Considering revenue alone, Inter surpassed city rivals in Deloitte Football Money League for the first time, in the 2008–09 season, to rank in 9th place, one place behind Juventus in 8th place. (Milan in 10th place.) In the 2009–10 season, Inter remained in 9th place, surpassing Juventus (10th) but Milan re-took the leading role as the 7th. Inter became the 8th in 2010–11, but was still one place behind Milan. Since 2011, Inter fell to 11th in 2011–12, 15th in 2012–13 and 17th in 2013–14 season. In 2008–09 season, Revenue percentages were divided up between matchday (14%, €28.2 million), broadcasting (59%, €115.7 million, +7%, +€8 million) and commercial (27%, €52.6 million, +43%). Kit sponsors Nike and Pirelli contributed €18.1 million and €9.3 million respectively to commercial revenues, while broadcasting revenues were boosted €1.6 million (6%) by Champions League distribution. in 2009–10 season the revenue was boosted by the sales of Ibrahimović, the treble and the release clause of coach José Mourinho. For the 2010–11 season, Serie A clubs started negotiating club TV rights collectively rather than individually. This was predicted to result in lower broadcasting revenues for Inter, with smaller clubs gaining from the loss. Eventually the result included an extraordinary income of €13 million from RAI. Deloitte expressed the idea that issues in Italian football, particularly matchday revenue issues were holding Inter back compared to other European giants, and developing their own stadia would result in Serie A clubs being more competitive on the world stage. However, combining revenue and cost, in the 2006–07 season they had a net loss of €206 million (€112 million extraordinary basis, due to the abolition of non-standard accounting practice of the special amortization fund), followed by €148 million in the 2007–08 season, €154 million in 2008–09 season, €69 million in the 2009–10 season, €87 million in the 2010–11 season, €77 million in the 2011–12 season. In 2015 Inter and Roma were the only two Italian clubs that were sanctioned by the UEFA due to their breaking of UEFA Financial Fair Play Regulations, which was followed by Milan which was barred from returning to European competition in 2018. As a probation to avoid further sanction, Inter agreed to have a three-year aggregate break-even from 2015 to 2018, with the 2015–16 season being allowed to have a net loss of a maximum of €30 million, followed by break-even in the 2016–17 season. Inter was also fined €6 million plus an additional €14 million in probation. Inter also made a financial trick in the transfer market in summer 2015, in which Stevan Jovetić and Miranda were signed by Inter on temporary deals plus an obligation to sign outright in 2017, making their cost less in the loan period. Moreover, despite heavily investing in new signings, namely Geoffrey Kondogbia and Ivan Perišić that potentially increased the cost in amortization, Inter also sold Mateo Kovačić for €29 million, making a windfall profit. On 21 April 2017, Inter announced that their net loss (FFP adjusted) of 2015–16 season was within the settlement agreement allowed limited of €30 million. However, UEFA also announced that the reduction of squad size of Inter in European competitions would not be lifted yet.

InterWorld - References - Netflix