There are custom pools and gardens - and then there are Lucas Lagoons. Animal Planet's new series, Insane Pools: Off the Deep End, follows award-winning pool designer Lucas Congdon as he turns high and dry homes into exotic waterfront properties through grand, nature-inspired designs to encourage his clients to rediscover their love of the outdoors.

Insane Pools: Off the Deep End - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2015-02-20

Insane Pools: Off the Deep End - Dwarf Fortress - Netflix

Dwarf Fortress (officially called Slaves to Armok: God of Blood Chapter II: Dwarf Fortress) is a part construction and management simulation, part roguelike, indie video game created by Tarn and Zach Adams. Freeware and in development since 2002, its first alpha version was released in 2006 and it received attention for being a two-member project surviving solely on donations. The primary game mode is set in a procedurally generated fantasy world in which the player indirectly controls a group of dwarves, and attempts to construct a successful and wealthy underground fortress. Critics praised its complex, emergent gameplay but had mixed reactions to its difficulty. The game influenced Minecraft and was selected among other games to be featured in the Museum of Modern Art to show the history of video gaming in 2012. The game has text-based graphics and is open-ended with no main objectives. Before playing, the player has to set in motion a process which generates worlds with continents, oceans and histories documenting civilizations. The main game mode, Fortress mode, consists of selecting a suitable site from the generated-world, establishing a successful colony or fortress, combating threats like goblin invasions, generating wealth and taking care of the dwarves. Each dwarf is modeled down to its individual personality, has likes or dislikes and specific trainable skills in various labors. The second main game mode, Adventure mode, is a turn-based, open-ended roguelike where the player starts off as an adventurer in the world and is free to explore, complete quests, or even visit old abandoned fortresses. The combat system is anatomically detailed with combat logs describing organs getting pierced, fat getting bruised and limbs getting severed. Prior to Dwarf Fortress, Tarn Adams was working on a project called Slaves to Armok: God of Blood which was a role-playing game. By 2004, Adams decided to shift from the original Armok to Dwarf Fortress after the former became difficult to maintain. Adams calls it his life's work and said in 2011, that version 1.0 will not be ready for at least another 20 years, and even after that he would continue to work on it. The game has a cult following and an active online community. As there is no way to win, every fortress, no matter how successful, is usually destroyed somehow. This prompts the official community motto: “Losing is Fun!”

Insane Pools: Off the Deep End - Early development (2002–2006) - Netflix

One of Tarn and Zach Adams' early works was a text based adventure game called dragslay, written in the BASIC language and influenced by Dungeons and Dragons. This was the brothers' first fantasy project. In high school, Tarn Adams taught himself the C programming language and developed it further. dragslay would later have an important influence on Dwarf Fortress. Adams explained his interest in fantasy games, that he had grown up “surrounded by that sort of thing...along with generic sci-fi, generic fantasy is part of our heritage.” Years later, before entering graduate school in mathematics, Adams began working on a project he called Slaves to Armok: God of Blood. It was named after a deity in dragslay, originally named for a variable “arm_ok”—which counted the limbs the player still had attached. This new project was a two-dimensional (would later have 3D graphics) isometric fantasy role-playing game in which the player encountered and fought goblins. Adams took some time off Armok to work on small side-projects, and another one which would inspire Dwarf Fortress was Mutant Miner. It was turn-based loosely inspired by a game called Miner VGA. Mutant Miner involved the player digging underneath buildings, searching for ores and fighting monsters, and carrying radioactive “goo” back to the surface for application in growing extra limbs and gaining other abilities. Adams was dissatisfied with only having a single miner, and the game began to lag because it was turn-based. Adams said:

[I]nstead of rewriting the game, I thought, well maybe it should be dwarves instead. And it should be real-time to combat the [lag] problem. Now, you'd be digging out minerals in a mountain, combating threats inside, and making little workshops. Then I thought, well, how should the high score list work? We really like to keep records of plays. Not just high score lists, but expansive logs. So we'll often try to think of ways to play with the idea. This time, the idea was to let your adventurer come into the fortress after you lose and find the goblets you've made, and journals it generates.

Insane Pools: Off the Deep End - References - Netflix