Hope is a producer of a local TV show whose cheating husband left her after 10 years. Gloria is a street wise single mother who works as a hairdresser. The two, with Gloria's son Buddy, share the ups and downs of their complicated but humorous lives.

Hope & Gloria - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 1995-03-09

Hope & Gloria - Gloria Stuart - Netflix

Gloria Frances Stuart (born Gloria Stewart; July 4, 1910 – September 26, 2010) was an American film and stage actress, visual artist, and activist. A native of Southern California, she began her acting in high school in the 1920s and on the stage in the 1930s and 1940s, performing in little theater and summer stock in Los Angeles and New York City. She signed a contract with Universal Pictures in 1932, and acted in numerous films for the studio, including The Old Dark House (1932), The Invisible Man (1933), and The Three Musketeers (1939). In 1945, after a tenure as a contract player for Twentieth Century Fox, Stuart abandoned her acting career and shifted to a career as an artist, working as a fine printer and making paintings, serigraphy, miniature books, Bonsai, and découpage for the next five decades. She returned to acting in the late 1970s, appearing in several bit parts, including in Richard Benjamin's My Favorite Year (1982) and Wildcats (1986). Stuart made a prominent return to cinema when she was cast as the 101-year-old elder Rose Dawson Calvert in James Cameron's Titanic (1997). Stuart's performance earned her a Screen Actors Guild Award and a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Her last film performance was in Wim Wenders' Land of Plenty (2004) before her death in 2010 at the age of 100. In addition to her acting and art career, Stuart was also an environmental activist and one of the founding members of the Screen Actors Guild.

Hope & Gloria - Introduction to Hollywood: 1932–1934 - Netflix

Stuart's performance in the theatre in Carmel brought her to the attention of Gilmor Brown's private theater, The Playbox, in Pasadena. She was invited there to appear as Masha in Anton Chekhov's The Seagull. Opening night, casting directors from Paramount and Universal were in the audience. Both came backstage to arrange a screen test, both studios claimed her. Finally the studios flipped a coin and Universal won the toss. Stuart considered herself a serious actress in theater but she and Newell “were stony broke, living hand to mouth” so she decided to sign the contract with Universal, which paid a bit more than Paramount. Stuart does not mention it in her book, but the Internet Movie Database includes her with thirty other players in a slapstick comedy, The Cohens and Kellys in Hollywood, A Behind-the-Scenes Farce. Produced by Universal in the spring of 1932, this is likely Gloria Stuart's first appearance before the camera. Stuart actually began her movie career by playing an ingénue confronting her father's mistress in Street of Women, a Pre-Code fallen-women film. Stuart's second turn, again playing the ingénue, was in a football-hero movie, The All-American. In early December, 1932, the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers announced that Gloria Stuart was one of fifteen new movie actresses “Most Likely to Succeed”—she was a WAMPAS Baby Star. Ginger Rogers, Mary Carlisle, Eleanor Holm were among the others.

“James [Whale] joined all the English actors,” Stuart recalled. "So on one side of the set they had their 'elevensies' and foursies,' and Melvyn [Douglas] and I would be sitting together, not invited. One day, Melvyn said to me,Are you interested in forming a union together?' I said, 'What's a union?' He said, 'Like in New York – Actor's Equity. The actors get together and work for better working conditions.' I said, 'Oh wonderful,' because I was getting up at five every morning; in makeup at seven, in hair at eight, wardrobe at quarter of nine, and then sometimes if production wanted you to, you worked until four or five the next morning. There was no overtime. They fed us when they felt like it, when it was convenient for production. It was really very, very hard work.

After filming completed, Stuart began canvassing, and was one of the union's first founding members. Stuart was given her first co-starring role by director John Ford in her next film, Air Mail, playing opposite Pat O'Brien and Ralph Bellamy. Of her performance in the movie, the New York Times Mordaunt Hall wrote, “Gloria Stuart, who does so well in The Old Dark House, a picture now at the Rialto, makes the most of the part of the girl...” That two Gloria Stuart movies were in theaters simultaneously became the rule rather than the exception in her early career. In 1932, her first year, Stuart had four films released, then nine in 1933, six in 1934. In 1935, Stuart was having a baby, so only four movies were released. Six movies followed in 1936. After Air Mail, Mordaunt Hall's notices for Gloria Stuart came down to a few words. Laughter in Hell: “Gloria Stuart appears as Lorraine...”; Sweepings: “...played by the comely Gloria Stuart...”; Private Jones: “Gloria Stuart is charming...” James Whale called Stuart back for just one scene in The Kiss Before the Mirror, but the critic Hall wrote, “There are those who may think that it is too bad to introduce as one of the players the dainty Gloria Stuart and have her killed off in the first episode of the narrative. Perhaps it is, but a pretty girl was needed for the part and Mr. Whale obviously did not wish to weaken his production by casting an incompetent actress or an unattractive one for this minor role.” After good notices in The Girl in 419, (Mordaunt Hall mentions “...the pleasing acting of the attractive Gloria Stuart), and Secret of the Blue Room (”Miss Stuart gives a pleasing performance."), James Whale cast Stuart opposite Claude Rains in The Invisible Man (1933). Rains was a celebrated import from the London stage and this was his first Hollywood film. (Mordaunt Hall's review of Stuart's work was a temperate, “Miss Stuart also does well by her role.”) The Invisible Man also became a cult favorite.

Stuart's career advanced when English director James Whale chose her for the glamour role as a sentimental wife who winds up stranded among strangers at a spooky mansion in his ensemble cast (Boris Karloff, Melvyn Douglas, Charles Laughton, Lilian Bond, Ernest Thesiger, Eva Moore and Raymond Massey) for The Old Dark House (1932). The film was critically praised, and The New York Times called Stuart's performance “clever and charming,” with the movie later becoming a cult classic. Stuart's experience filming The Old Dark House also became integral to the formation of the Screen Actors Guild in 1933:

Hope & Gloria - References - Netflix