On the advice of Professor Tsukuba, a physician she respects, houseman Togano Makoto takes training at forensic medicine classes. She gingerly steps into a classroom with a strange atmosphere. The eccentric but outstanding forensic professor Kosaki Tojiro gives her a polite brush-off and leaves the place. Makoto trains under Kosaki in a story that throws the ethical conflict surrounding autopsies and human relationships into sharp relief.

Hippocratic Oath - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Japanese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 54 minutes

Premier: 2016-10-02

Hippocratic Oath - Hippocrates - Netflix

Hippocrates of Kos (; Greek: Ἱπποκράτης ὁ Κῷος Hippokrátēs ho Kṓos; c. 460 – c. 370 BC), also known as Hippocrates II, was a Greek physician of the Age of Pericles (Classical Greece), and is considered one of the most outstanding figures in the history of medicine. He is often referred to as the “Father of Medicine” in recognition of his lasting contributions to the field as the founder of the Hippocratic School of Medicine. This intellectual school revolutionized medicine in ancient Greece, establishing it as a discipline distinct from other fields with which it had traditionally been associated (theurgy and philosophy), thus establishing medicine as a profession. However, the achievements of the writers of the Corpus, the practitioners of Hippocratic medicine and the actions of Hippocrates himself were often commingled; thus very little is known about what Hippocrates actually thought, wrote, and did. Hippocrates is commonly portrayed as the paragon of the ancient physician, and credited with coining the Hippocratic Oath, which is still relevant and in use today. He is also credited with greatly advancing the systematic study of clinical medicine, summing up the medical knowledge of previous schools, and prescribing practices for physicians through the Hippocratic Corpus and other works.

Hippocratic Oath - Legacy - Netflix

Hippocrates is widely considered to be the “Father of Medicine”. His contributions revolutionized the practice of medicine; but after his death the advancement stalled. So revered was Hippocrates that his teachings were largely taken as too great to be improved upon and no significant advancements of his methods were made for a long time. The centuries after Hippocrates' death were marked as much by retrograde movement as by further advancement. For instance, “after the Hippocratic period, the practice of taking clinical case-histories died out,” according to Fielding Garrison. After Hippocrates, the next significant physician was Galen, a Greek who lived from AD 129 to AD 200. Galen perpetuated Hippocratic medicine, moving both forward and backward. In the Middle Ages, the Islamic world adopted Hippocratic methods and developed new medical technologies. After the European Renaissance, Hippocratic methods were revived in western Europe and even further expanded in the 19th century. Notable among those who employed Hippocrates' rigorous clinical techniques were Thomas Sydenham, William Heberden, Jean-Martin Charcot and William Osler. Henri Huchard, a French physician, said that these revivals make up “the whole history of internal medicine.”

Hippocratic Oath - References - Netflix