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Head2Head - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: None

Head2Head - Talking Heads - Netflix

Talking Heads was an American rock band formed in 1975 in New York City and active until 1991. The band comprised David Byrne (lead vocals, guitar), Chris Frantz (drums), Tina Weymouth (bass), and Jerry Harrison (keyboards, guitar). Described by the critic Stephen Thomas Erlewine as "one of the most critically acclaimed bands of the '80s, the group helped to pioneer new wave music by integrating elements of punk, art rock, funk, and world music with avant-garde sensibilities and an anxious, clean-cut image. Former art school students who became involved in the 1970s New York punk scene, Talking Heads released its debut album, Talking Heads: 77, to positive reviews in 1977. They subsequently collaborated with the producer Brian Eno on a trio of experimental and critically acclaimed releases: More Songs About Buildings and Food (1978), Fear of Music (1979), and Remain in Light (1980). After a hiatus, the band hit its commercial peak in 1983 with the U.S. Top 10 hit “Burning Down the House” and released the concert film Stop Making Sense, directed by Jonathan Demme. The band released several more albums, including their best-selling LP Little Creatures (1985), before disbanding in 1991. In 2002, the band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Four of the band's albums appeared on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time, and three of their songs (“Psycho Killer”, “Life During Wartime”, and “Once in a Lifetime”) were included among the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll. Talking Heads was also number 64 on VH1's list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”. In the 2011 update of Rolling Stone's “100 Greatest Artists of All Time”, the band was ranked at number 100.

Head2Head - 1978–1980: Collaborations with Eno - Netflix

The Eno-Talking Heads experimentation continued with 1979's Fear of Music, which flirted with the darker stylings of post-punk rock, mixed with white funkadelia and subliminal references to the geopolitical instability of the late 1970s. Music journalist Simon Reynolds cited Fear of Music as representing the Eno-Talking Heads collaboration “at its most mutually fruitful and equitable”. The single “Life During Wartime” produced the catchphrase “This ain't no party, this ain't no disco.” The song refers to the Mudd Club and CBGB, two popular New York nightclubs of the time. Remain in Light (1980) was heavily influenced by the afrobeat of Nigerian bandleader Fela Kuti, whose music Eno had introduced to the band. It explored West African polyrhythms, weaving these together with Arabic music from North Africa, disco funk, and “found” voices. These combinations foreshadowed Byrne's later interest in world music. In order to perform these more complex arrangements, the band toured with an expanded group, including Adrian Belew and Bernie Worrell, among others, first at the Heatwave festival in August, and later in their concert film Stop Making Sense. During this period, Tina Weymouth and Chris Frantz also formed a commercially successful splinter group, Tom Tom Club, influenced by the foundational elements of hip hop, and Harrison released his first solo album, The Red and the Black. Likewise, Byrne—in collaboration with Eno—released My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, which incorporated world music and found sounds, as well as including a number of other prominent international and post-punk musicians. All were released by Sire. Remain in Light's lead single, “Once in a Lifetime”, became a Top 20 hit in the UK, but initially failed to make an impression upon its release in the band's own country. But it grew into a popular standard over the next few years on the strength of its music video, which was named one of Time magazine's All-TIME Best Music Videos.

More Songs About Buildings and Food (1978) brought about the band's long-term collaboration with producer Brian Eno, who had previously worked with Roxy Music, David Bowie, John Cale and Robert Fripp; the title of Eno's 1977 song “King's Lead Hat” is an anagram of the band's name. Eno's unusual style meshed well with the group's artistic sensibilities, and they began to explore an increasingly diverse range of musical directions, from post-punk to psychedelic funk to African music. This recording also established the band's long-term recording studio relationship with the famous Compass Point Studios in Nassau, Bahamas. More Songs... cover of Al Green's “Take Me to the River” broke Talking Heads into general public consciousness and gave the band their first Billboard Top 30 hit.

Head2Head - References - Netflix