Harlem Globetrotters (called Harlem Globe Trotters in the opening titles) is a Saturday morning cartoon produced by Hanna-Barbera and CBS Productions, featuring animated versions of players from the famous basketball team, Harlem Globetrotters. Broadcast from September 12, 1970, to September 2, 1972 on CBS, and later re-run on NBC as The Go-Go Globetrotters, the show featured cartoon versions of George "Meadowlark" Lemon, Freddie "Curly" Neal, Hubert "Geese" Ausbie, J.C. "Gip" Gipson, Bobby Joe Mason, and Pablo Robertson, alongside their fictional bus driver and manager, Granny, and their dog mascot. Dribbles. The series worked to a formula where the team travels somewhere and typically get involved in a local conflict that leads to one of the Globetrotters proposing a basketball game to settle the issue.

Harlem Globe Trotters - Netflix

Type: Animation

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 1970-09-12

Harlem Globe Trotters - Eddie "Rochester" Anderson - Netflix

Edmund Lincoln Anderson (September 18, 1905 – February 28, 1977) was an American comedian and actor. To a generation of early radio and television comedy he was known as “Rochester.” Anderson got his start in show business as a teenager on the vaudeville circuit. In the early 1930s, he transitioned into films and radio. In 1937, he began his most famous role of Rochester van Jones, usually known simply as “Rochester”, the valet of Jack Benny, on his NBC radio show The Jack Benny Program. Anderson became the first Black American to have a regular role on a nationwide radio program. When the series moved to CBS television in 1950, Anderson continued in the role until the series' end in 1965. After the series ended, Anderson remained active with guest starring roles on television and voice work in animated series. He was also an avid horse-racing fan who owned several race horses and worked as a horse trainer at the Hollywood Park Racetrack. Anderson was married twice and had four children. He died of heart disease in February 1977 at the age of 71.

Harlem Globe Trotters - Other business ventures - Netflix

Though Anderson had roles in films such as The Green Pastures and was a dancer at the Cotton Club in Culver City, California when he first came to Hollywood, his real success did not arrive until he became a regular on The Jack Benny Program. Not long after he became a regular cast member on the Benny show, Anderson opened a nightclub in the Central Avenue section of Los Angeles. Anderson's nightclub was short-lived because he was too generous with his friends. The club was picking up the tab for too many guests and Anderson was forced to close the nightclub not long after it opened. During World War II, Anderson was the owner of the Pacific Parachute Company, an African-American owned and operated business that made parachutes for the Army and Navy. He also managed a boxer, Billy Metcalfe, in the 1940s. Anderson had an astute business sense; in 1948, he saw the value and potential of Las Vegas as an entertainment center. With the idea of building and operating a hotel and casino there where African-Americans would be welcome, he asked for investors to join him in the venture. Anderson failed to attract enough people willing to invest, and he was unable to complete the plan. When the Moulin Rouge Hotel, an integrated hotel and casino, opened in 1955, Anderson was brought in for its opening. He expressed regret at the thought that the hotel might have been his if he had the further financial backing.

Harlem Globe Trotters - References - Netflix