Frankie Boyle's Tramadol Nights was a comedy sketch show created in 2010 by Frankie Boyle, starring Boyle himself alongside Jim Muir, Tom Stade, Robert Florence and Thaila Zucchi.

Frankie Boyle's Tramadol Nights - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 35 minutes

Premier: 2010-11-30

Frankie Boyle's Tramadol Nights - Frankie Boyle's Tramadol Nights - Netflix

Frankie Boyle’s Tramadol Nights is a comedy sketch show created in 2010 by Frankie Boyle, starring Boyle himself alongside Jim Muir, Tom Stade, Robert Florence and Thaila Zucchi.

Frankie Boyle's Tramadol Nights - Critical reception - Netflix

The show received a mixed critical reception. The first episode, broadcast on 30 November 2010 after an advertising campaign on London buses, attracted a “modest” audience (1.54 million viewers including the time-shifted repeat the same evening). The free daily newspaper Metro applauded the first episode's blend of stand-up and sketches, that “cantered gleefully – but never gratuitously - past the boundaries of taste and decency” with “some fantastically acerbic rants about religious people and the mentally ill.” The Independent's Rhiannon Harries felt “the best of the sketches were those that satirised the bland inanity of TV culture” but was “less comfortable with the jokes about mental illness” that more or less “conflated religion and autism”, concluding that there was “something very brittle about the laughter. The world seems a meaner place after listening to Boyle.” The Liverpool Echo observed that “in a former life, not so long ago, Boyle was the best thing about Mock the Week” but thought the new series' uncompromising material “was, somehow, over the top and below the belt at the same time,” culminating in a parody of Knight Rider that was “one of the most tedious and unfunny sketches in the history of tedious and unfunny sketches.” In The Guardian, John Crace, noting that the absence of previews was usually PR speak for “We don't think it's much good and we want to avoid it getting a kicking,” implied that Boyle's standup sequences were re-hashed from his recent “least exciting” tour. The conclusion that Boyle – known for “heartless sensitivity-baiting and not much else” – has been given “enough rope to hang himself” is difficult to resist. But “there are flashes of the caustic wit that make him great” and “even to those who've heard his jokes before, there are laugh-out-loud moments.” Writing in The Scotsman, Aidan Smith said he didn't find any of the jokes very funny and the filmed sketches “showed up Boyle's limitations as a comic actor.” MSN's Stuart Bak wondered whether Frankie Boyle was still funny. In sketch form, his material is “neither particularly offensive nor particularly funny, but a bit run-of-the-mill and even, at times, embarrassingly awful” so Boyle should “stick to the stand-up.” The British Comedy Guide branded the show “disappointing”, citing “over-long sketches” and an “almost childish fixation on sex”. On 7 December the second episode (including the time-shifted repeat) reached 1.14 million viewers, down 26% on week one. Metro withdrew its support, claiming “laughs were thin on the ground” in the second week and that in the third episode “almost without exception, the sketches were wholly unfunny and the in-house audience seemed to be struggling to raise even the smallest of titters.” The final episode was broadcast on 29 December and averaged an audience of 575,000.

Frankie Boyle's Tramadol Nights - References - Netflix