It's a Saturday afternoon and as your bowl of potato chips balances delicately on what can only be referred to as 'a little extra to love,' you think to yourself: if it came down to it, would I be able to survive in an extreme situation? As you wipe the last of the potato chip grease onto your sweatpants, the answer is inevitably yes. It's time to put that theory to the test! The Weather Channel is taking average Joes and lifting them off the couch and conditioning them to not only brave the elements, but to conquer them. With the help of The Weather Channel's resident Survival Expert Creek Stewart three guys will face nature's reckoning and find out what they are truly made of. (Spoiler: it's manliness).

Each week, "Fat Guys in the Woods" will follow three new "Joes" as Creek teaches them to build shelter, fire, scavange and hunt all in the name of survival. They will have no choice but to be forced to survive alone in the wild. Free of life's usual comforts (a bed, showers, a takeout menu) and forced into nature's most challenging situations, these men will put down those potatoe chips and fight to prove themselves. At the end of the day survival is simple... just don't die.

Fat Guys in the Woods - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: To Be Determined

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2014-08-10

Fat Guys in the Woods - Adipose tissue - Netflix

In biology, adipose tissue, body fat, or simply fat is a loose connective tissue composed mostly of adipocytes. In addition to adipocytes, adipose tissue contains the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of cells including preadipocytes, fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells and a variety of immune cells such as adipose tissue macrophages. Adipose tissue is derived from preadipocytes. Its main role is to store energy in the form of lipids, although it also cushions and insulates the body. Far from being hormonally inert, adipose tissue has, in recent years, been recognized as a major endocrine organ, as it produces hormones such as leptin, estrogen, resistin, and the cytokine TNFα. The two types of adipose tissue are white adipose tissue (WAT), which stores energy, and brown adipose tissue (BAT), which generates body heat. The formation of adipose tissue appears to be controlled in part by the adipose gene. Adipose tissue – more specifically brown adipose tissue – was first identified by the Swiss naturalist Conrad Gessner in 1551.

Fat Guys in the Woods - Brown fat - Netflix

Brown fat or brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a specialized form of adipose tissue important for adaptive thermogenesis in humans and other mammals. BAT can generate heat by “uncoupling” the respiratory chain of oxidative phosphorylation within mitochondria through tissue-specific expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). BAT is primarily located around the neck and large blood vessels of the thorax, where may effectively act in heat exchange. BAT is robustly activated upon cold exposure by the release of catecholamines from sympathetic nerves that results in UCP1 activation. BAT activation may also occur in response to overfeeding. UCP1 activity is stimulated by long chain fatty acids that are produced subsequent to β-adrenergic receptor activation. UCP1 is proposed to function as a fatty acid proton symporter, although the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. In contrast, UCP1 is inhibited by ATP, ADP, and GTP. Attempts to simulate this process pharmacologically have so far been unsuccessful. Techniques to manipulate the differentiation of “brown fat” could become a mechanism for weight loss therapy in the future, encouraging the growth of tissue with this specialized metabolism without inducing it in other organs. Until recently, brown adipose tissue was thought to be primarily limited to infants in humans, but new evidence has now overturned that belief. Metabolically active tissue with temperature responses similar to brown adipose was first reported in the neck and trunk of some human adults in 2007, and the presence of brown adipose in human adults was later verified histologically in the same anatomical regions.

Fat Guys in the Woods - References - Netflix