Drawing on the expertise of a body language expert, linguistics professor and a criminal psychologist, some of the most famous modern-day UK crime stories are forensically examined in this exclusive ID series.

Faking It: Tears of a Crime - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: To Be Determined

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2017-01-06

Faking It: Tears of a Crime - John Walsh (television host) - Netflix

John Edward Walsh Jr. (born December 26, 1945) is an American television personality, criminal investigator, human rights, victim rights advocate, and the host/creator, of America's Most Wanted. Walsh is known for his anti-crime activism, with which he became involved following the murder of his son, Adam, in 1981; in 2008, the late serial killer Ottis Toole was named as the killer of Walsh's son. Walsh was part owner of the now defunct Museum of Crime & Punishment in Washington, D.C. He also anchors an investigative documentary series, The Hunt with John Walsh, which debuted on CNN in 2014.

Faking It: Tears of a Crime - Controversy - Netflix

John Walsh generated a great deal of controversy during a summer press tour in 2006 when he stated to the media he jokingly told senators to implant “exploding” chips in the anuses of sex offenders. He stated, “I said implant it in their anus and if they go outside the radius, explode it, that would send a big message.” Walsh stated this was a “joke,” but that “nobody thought it was funny.” Walsh later suggested implanting GPS chips in such criminals. John Walsh also faced criticism when he advised women to never hire a male babysitter, which was seen as a blatantly sexist remark. “It's not a witch hunt,” he said. “It's all about minimizing risks. What dog is more likely to bite and hurt you? A Doberman, not a poodle. Who's more likely to molest a child? A male.” In his book Tears of Rage, Walsh openly admits being in a relationship with 16-year-old Revé when Walsh was in his early 20s and aware of the age of consent being 17 in New York. Critics of Adam Walsh Act have pointed out that, had he been convicted, Walsh himself would be subject to sex offender registration under the law which he aggressively promoted. Some critics accuse Walsh of creating predator panic by using his publicity. Walsh was heard by Congress on February 2, 1983, where he gave an unsourced claim of 50,000 abducted and 1.5 million missing children annually. He testified that the U.S. is “littered with mutilated, decapitated, raped, strangled children”, when in fact, later Department of Justice study from 1999 found only 115 incidences of stereotypical kidnappings perpetrated by strangers, of which about 50 resulted in death or child not being found. Critics claim that Adam Walsh Child Resource Center, which started without funding in 1981, generated 1.5 million dollars annually following his testimony before the Congress. In fiscal year ending 2015, Walsh's private charity, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, received income from the following sources: Contributions, Gifts & Grants $7,810,614 Federated Campaigns $157,239 Fundraising Events $2,257,837 Government Grants $31,886,730 for a total of $42,112,420. Compensation of the CEO, John Ryan, was $442,924 or over 1% of expenses.

Faking It: Tears of a Crime - References - Netflix