From the ashes of World War I, Adolf Hitler and his National Socialist party plunged the world into the bloodiest of all wars and committed the greatest atrocities in human history. Nazis: Evolution of Evilreveals how the National Socialists exploited the economic turmoil of their time, rose to power in Germany in 1933 and then led their nation into a nightmare of everyday brutality, genocide and military defeat. It follows the leading personalities who played out the drama of destroying democracy, murdering opponents and bringing destruction to Europe and the world. Adolf Hitler, Hermann Goering, Heinrich Himmler, Joseph Goebbels, all played their part in giving voters what they wanted and then betrayed them with a vicious totalitarian state. This is the true story of the rise - and fall - of the Nazi Party.

Evolution of Evil - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2014-02-14

Evolution of Evil - Problem of evil - Netflix

The problem of evil refers to the question of how to reconcile the existence of evil with an omnibenevolent, omniscient, and omnipotent God (see theism). An argument from evil attempts to show that the co-existence of evil and such a God is unlikely or impossible. Attempts to show the contrary have traditionally been discussed under the heading of theodicy. Besides philosophy of religion, the problem of evil is also important to the field of theology and ethics. The problem of evil is often formulated in two forms: the logical problem of evil and the evidential problem of evil. The logical form of the argument tries to show a logical impossibility in the coexistence of God and evil, while the evidential form tries to show that given the evil in the world, it is improbable that there is an omnipotent, omniscient, and wholly good God. The problem of evil has been extended to non-human life forms, to include animal suffering from natural evils and human cruelty against them. Responses to various versions of the problem of evil, meanwhile, come in three forms: refutations, defenses, and theodicies. A wide range of responses have been made against these arguments. There are also many discussions of evil and associated problems in other philosophical fields, such as secular ethics, and evolutionary ethics. But as usually understood, the “problem of evil” is posed in a theological context. The problem of evil acutely applies to monotheistic religions such as Christianity, Islam, and Judaism that believe in a monotheistic God who is omnipotent, omniscient and omnibenevolent; but it has also been studied in religions that are non-theistic or polytheistic, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Evolution of Evil - Skeptical theism - Netflix

Skeptical theism defends the problem of evil by asserting that God allows an evil to happen in order to prevent a greater evil or to encourage a response that will lead to a greater good. Thus a rape or a murder of an innocent child is defended as having a God's purpose that a human being may not comprehend, but which may lead to lesser evil or greater good. This is called skeptical theism because the argument aims to encourage self-skepticism, either by trying to rationalize God's possible hidden motives, or by trying to explain it as a limitation of human ability to know. The greater good defense is more often argued in religious studies in response to the evidential version of the problem of evil, while the free will defense is usually discussed in the context of the logical version. Most scholars criticize the skeptical theism defense as “devaluing the suffering” and not addressing the premise that God is all-benevolent and should be able to stop all suffering and evil, rather than play a balancing act.

Evolution of Evil - References - Netflix