Don't Scare the Hare is a 2011 British television game show from the BBC, hosted by Jason Bradbury and narrated by Sue Perkins. The programme was aired on BBC One on Saturday evenings and was first transmitted on 23 April 2011.

This series had been planned to run for nine episodes but it was taken off air after six episodes because of poor ratings. The remaining three episodes were broadcast in October.

In the show, contestants must compete in a series of challenges to win £15,000 of prize money; failure to complete questions and physical challenges risks "scaring" a giant robotic hare.

Don't Scare the Hare - Netflix

Type: Game Show

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 50 minutes

Premier: 2011-04-23

Don't Scare the Hare - Don't Scare the Hare - Netflix

Don't Scare the Hare is a 2011 British television game show produced by Initial (a subsidiary of Endemol UK) for the BBC, hosted by Jason Bradbury and narrated by Sue Perkins. The programme was aired on BBC One on Saturday evenings and was first transmitted on 23 April 2011, before the first episode of the 6th series of Doctor Who. This series had been planned to run for nine episodes but it was taken off air after six episodes because of poor ratings. The remaining three episodes were rescheduled for broadcast in October 2011. In the show, contestants must compete in a series of challenges to win £15,000 of prize money; failure to complete questions and physical challenges risks “scaring” a giant robotic hare. The programme has been described by its host as “fantasy based toddler telly with an adult twist”. It was the first series to be made at dock10 , formally Mediacity Studios Ltd, at MediaCityUK in Salford.

Don't Scare the Hare - Reception - Netflix

The first episode received overnight ratings of 1.93 million viewers, a 15% audience share. Although hot weather was given as a possible reason for the low ratings, it was reported that many viewers were unimpressed with the show, assuming it was a one-off to tie in with Easter (since the tagline used to promote the show was “this year, the Easter bunny has competition”), and were surprised to learn that more episodes were scheduled to be broadcast. Justin Mason, critic for ATV, said, “I don't think I've quite seen anything like Don't Scare the Hare. I was wondering who on earth dreamt up the idea... it looked like a cheap, children's quiz-show that would be better placed on CBeebies than prime-time BBC One.” Jim Shelley of the Daily Mirror was equally as critical, summing up his review as follows: “The idiots playing might have enjoyed themselves but even toddlers would have found the games dull and Jason creepy.” A review in The Stage observed: “The actual games are pretty feeble and uninspired, leaving the poor hare and his robotic novelty value to carry the show. Unfortunately, the hare is far from impressive either. Doctor Who's tin dog K9 managed more personality and manoeuvrability, and he was operating within the confines of seventies technology.” John Anson of the Lancashire Evening Post opined: “If you’re going to have a gimmick in your game show at least make it entertaining. Surely this is a programme which would have been ideal for CBeebies. Make the questions simple, involve bunches of kids and hey, presto it works... But primetime Saturday night viewing it ain’t.” Digital Spy's Alex Fletcher noted: “Not since the days of Mr Blobby and Ice Warriors have weekends been filled with such peculiar antics.” The second episode, aired on 30 April, achieved an audience of 1.39m (10.5%). By the fourth episode, the viewing audience had declined to 900,000 viewers (a 5.9% audience share). Because the show has been so poorly received, BBC One decided to reschedule it to an earlier timeslot, beginning on 14 May. Don't Scare the Hare was moved from 17:25 to 16:40, while the second series of So You Think You Can Dance? – whose ratings have also struggled – was aired earlier. The schedule change was spurred on by the broadcast of the 2011 Eurovision Song Contest, which aired on 14 May. On the previous day, 13 May, the BBC had announced that the series would be cancelled after only three episodes had been aired. Speaking about the programme on an edition of BBC Breakfast, the BBC’s entertainment controller Mark Linsey said: “Obviously Hare is not going well. It was a huge risk we took – it’s co-hosted by an animatronic hare – and while it’s proved successful with children, we were hoping there would be enough knowingness within the show to draw in the adults. There wasn’t enough of that, which is where it fell down.” The final 3 episodes which hadn't aired were rescheduled for October.

Don't Scare the Hare - References - Netflix