"Deer & Deer Hunting TV" begins airing the fourth week of July on NBC Sports. This is our 7th season, and it promises to be our best to date. Show hosts Dan Schmidt, Gordy Krahn, Steve Bartyulla and Mark Kayser will bring incredible depth, insight and experience from their decades of hunting to viewers, while also welcoming special guests such as Charles Alsheimer and others. Show topics include creating a deer utopia, patterning without getting patterned, becoming the invisible hunter, how to hunt smarter, hunting from ground blinds, the facts on scrapes, the mentality of mature bucks, turning hunting pressure into a positive and attainable deer management. We'll also have our exclusive rut predictions and guides for predicting peak rutting times in the North and South. The 11th season will cover topics ranging from basic hunting strategy and biology of deer to today's technology, ammunition, firearms, bows, crossbows and gear. It's shaping up to be a great season loaded with super information about our country's favorite game animal.

Deer & Deer Hunting TV is the thinking man's guide to whitetail hunting, teaching, entertaining and informing hunters on proven strategies, hot trends and new equipment. Deer & Deer Hunting TV airs in prime time on NBC Sports.

Deer and Deer Hunting TV - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2009-11-13

Deer and Deer Hunting TV - The Deer Hunter - Netflix

The Deer Hunter is a 1978 American epic war drama film co-written and directed by Michael Cimino about a trio of Russian American steelworkers whose lives are changed forever after they fought in the Vietnam War. The three soldiers are played by Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, and John Savage, with John Cazale (in his final role), Meryl Streep, and George Dzundza playing supporting roles. The story takes place in Clairton, Pennsylvania, a small working class town on the Monongahela River south of Pittsburgh, and in Vietnam. The film was based in part on an unproduced screenplay called The Man Who Came to Play by Louis Garfinkle and Quinn K. Redeker, about Las Vegas and Russian roulette. Producer Michael Deeley, who bought the script, hired writer/director Michael Cimino who, with Deric Washburn, rewrote the script, taking the Russian roulette element and placing it in the Vietnam War. The film went over-budget and over-schedule, and ended up costing $15 million. The scenes depicting Russian roulette were highly controversial after the film's release. The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director for Michael Cimino, and Best Supporting Actor for Christopher Walken, and marked Meryl Streep's first Academy Award nomination (for Best Supporting Actress); she would go on to become the most nominated actor in history. In 1996 it was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”, and was named the 53rd greatest American film of all time by the American Film Institute in 2007 in their 10th Anniversary Edition of the AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies list.

Deer and Deer Hunting TV - Reception - Netflix

Its greatness is blunted by its length and one-sided point of view, but the film's weaknesses are overpowered by Michael Cimino's sympathetic direction and a series of heartbreaking performances from Robert De Niro, Meryl Streep, and Christopher Walken.

The film's initial reviews were largely positive. It was hailed by many critics as the best American epic since Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather. The film was praised for its depiction of realistic working class settings and environment; Cimino's direction; the performances of De Niro, Walken, Streep, Savage, Dzundza and Cazale; the symphonic shifts of tone and pacing in moving from America to Vietnam; the tension during the Russian roulette scenes; and the themes of American disillusionment. Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave the film four stars and called it “one of the most emotionally shattering films ever made.” Gene Siskel from the Chicago Tribune praised the film, saying, “This is a big film, dealing with big issues, made on a grand scale. Much of it, including some casting decisions, suggest inspiration by The Godfather.” Leonard Maltin also gave the film four stars, calling it a “sensitive, painful, evocative work”. Vincent Canby of The New York Times called The Deer Hunter “a big, awkward, crazily ambitious motion picture that comes as close to being a popular epic as any movie about this country since The Godfather. Its vision is that of an original, major new filmmaker.” David Denby of New York called it “an epic” with “qualities that we almost never see any more—range and power and breadth of experience.” Jack Kroll of Time asserted it put director Cimino “right at the center of film culture.” Stephen Farber pronounced the film in New West magazine as “the greatest anti-war movie since La Grande Illusion.” However, The Deer Hunter was not without critical backlash. Pauline Kael of The New Yorker wrote a positive review with some reservations: “[It is] a small minded film with greatness in it ... with an enraptured view of common life ... [but] enraging, because, despite its ambitiousness and scale, it has no more moral intelligence than the Eastwood action pictures.” Andrew Sarris wrote that the film was “massively vague, tediously elliptical, and mysteriously hysterical ... It is perhaps significant that the actors remain more interesting than the characters they play.” Jonathan Rosenbaum disparaged The Deer Hunter as an “Oscar-laden weepie about macho buddies” and “a disgusting account of what the evil Vietnamese did to poor, innocent Americans”. John Simon of New York wrote: “For all its pretensions to something newer and better, this film is only an extension of the old Hollywood war-movie lie. The enemy is still bestial and stupid, and no match for our purity and heroism; only we no longer wipe up the floor with him—rather, we litter it with his guts.” Author Karina Longworth notes that Streep “made a case for female empowerment by playing a woman to whom empowerment was a foreign concept—a normal lady from an average American small town, for whom subservience was the only thing she knew”. She states that The Deer Hunter “evokes a version of dominant masculinity in which male friendship is a powerful force”. It has a “credibly humanist message”, and that the “slow study of the men in blissfully ignorant homeland machismo is crucial to it”. The film holds a metascore of 73 on Metacritic, based on seven reviews, and 94% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 48 reviews. The RT summary reads:

Deer and Deer Hunting TV - References - Netflix