Block B – Unter Arrest - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: German

Status: Ended

Runtime: 50 minutes

Premier: 2015-03-12

Block B – Unter Arrest - Anders Behring Breivik - Netflix

Fjotolf Hansen (born Anders Behring Breivik (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈɑnːəʂ ˈbeːriŋ ˈbræiviːk] ( listen); born 13 February 1979), also known by his pseudonym Andrew Berwick, is a Norwegian far-right terrorist who committed the 2011 Norway attacks. On 22 July 2011 he killed eight people by detonating a van bomb amid Regjeringskvartalet in Oslo, then shot dead 69 participants of a Workers' Youth League (AUF) summer camp on the island of Utøya. In August 2012 he was convicted of mass murder, causing a fatal explosion, and terrorism. On the day of the attacks, Breivik electronically distributed a compendium of texts entitled 2083: A European Declaration of Independence, describing his militant ideology. In them, he lays out a worldview encompassing opposition to Islam and blaming feminism for creating a European “cultural suicide”. The texts call Islam and “Cultural Marxism” the enemy and advocate the deportation of all Muslims from Europe based on the model of the Beneš decrees, while also claiming that feminism exists to destroy European culture. Breivik wrote that his main motive for the atrocities was to market his manifesto. Two teams of court-appointed forensic psychiatrists examined Breivik before his trial. The first report diagnosed Breivik as having paranoid schizophrenia. A second psychiatric evaluation was commissioned following widespread criticism of the first. The second evaluation was published a week before the trial; it concluded that Breivik was not psychotic during the attacks nor during the evaluation. He was instead diagnosed as having narcissistic personality disorder. His trial began on 16 April 2012, with closing arguments made on 22 June 2012. On 24 August 2012, Oslo District Court delivered its verdict, finding Breivik sane and guilty of murdering 77 people. He was sentenced to 21 years in prison, in a form of preventive detention that required a minimum of 10 years incarceration and the possibility of one or more extensions for as long as he is deemed a danger to society. This is the maximum penalty in Norway. Breivik announced that he did not recognize the legitimacy of the court and therefore did not accept its decision—he claims he “cannot” appeal because this would legitimize the authority of the Oslo District Court. While imprisoned, Breivik has identified himself as a fascist and a national socialist, saying he previously exploited counterjihadist rhetoric in order to protect ethno-nationalists. In 2015, he said that he has never personally identified as a Christian, and called his religion Odinism. In 2016, Breivik sued Norwegian Correctional Service, claiming that his solitary confinement violated his human rights and subjected him to degrading treatment and privacy violations. In its judgment of 20 April 2016, the City Court found that Breivik's rights under Article 3 of the Convention had been violated, but not those under Article 8. The government appealed against the City Court's judgment as concerned the finding of a breach of Article 3 of the Convention, while Breivik appealed as concerned the finding that Article 8 had not been breached. On 1 March 2017, the Court of Appeals ruled that neither Article 3 nor Article 8 had been breached. On 8 June 2017, Norway's Supreme Court upheld the verdict of the Court of Appeals. On 30 June 2017, Breivik filed a complaint with the European Court of Human Rights, which the court dismissed on 21 June 2018.

Block B – Unter Arrest - Planning terror attacks - Netflix

Breivik claims that in 2002 (at the age of 23) he started a nine-year-plan to finance the 2011 attacks, founding his own computer programming business while working at the customer service company. He claims that his company grew to six employees and “several offshore bank accounts”, and that he made his first million kroner at the age of 24. He writes in his manifesto that he lost 2 million kroner on stock speculation, but still had about 2 million kroner to finance the attack. The company was later declared bankrupt and Breivik was reported for several breaches of the law. He then moved back to his mother's home, according to himself to save money. The first set of psychiatrists who evaluated him said in their report his mental health deteriorated at this stage and he went into a state of withdrawal and isolation. His declared assets in 2007 were about kr 630,000. (US$116,410), according to Norwegian tax authority figures. He claims that by 2008 he had about kr 2,000,000 (US$369,556) and nine credit cards giving him access to €26,000 in credit. In May 2009, he founded a farming company under the name “Breivik Geofarm”, described as a farming sole proprietorship set up to cultivate vegetables, melons, roots, and tubers. In 2010, he visited Prague in an attempt to buy illegal weapons. He was unable to obtain a weapon there and decided to get weapons through legal channels in Norway instead. He bought one semi-automatic 9 mm Glock 34 pistol legally by demonstrating his membership in a pistol club in the police application for a gun license, and the semi-automatic Ruger Mini-14 rifle by possessing a hunting license. Breivik's manifesto included writings detailing how he played video games such as World of Warcraft to relax, and Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 for “training-simulation”. He told a court in April 2012 that he trained for shooting using a holographic device while playing Call of Duty. He claimed it helped him gain target acquisition. Breivik had no declared income in 2009 and his assets amounted to 390,000 kroner ($72,063), according to Norwegian tax authority figures. He states that in January 2010 his funds were “depleting gradually”. On 23 June 2011, a month before the attacks, he paid the outstanding amount on his nine credit cards so he could have access to funds during his preparations. In late June or early July 2011, he moved to a rural area south of Åsta in Åmot, Hedmark county, about 140 km (87 mi) north-east of Oslo, the site of his farm. As he admits in his manifesto he used the company as a cover to legally obtain large amounts of artificial fertiliser and other chemicals for the manufacturing of explosives. A farming supplier sold Breivik's company six tonnes of fertiliser in May. The newspaper Verdens Gang reported that after Breivik bought a small quantity of an explosive primer from an online shop in Poland, his name was among 60 passed to the Police Security Service (PST) by the Norwegian Customs Service as having used the store to buy products. Speaking to the newspaper, Jon Fitje of PST said the information they found gave no indication of anything suspicious. He sets the cost of the preparations for the attacks at €317,000 – “130,000 out of pocket and 187,500 euros in lost revenue over three years.” [sic] Breivik's farmer neighbour described him as looking like a “city dweller, who wore expensive shirts and who knew nothing about rural ways”. Breivik had also covered up the windows of his house. The owner of a local bar, who once worked as a profiler of passengers' body language at Oslo airport, said there was nothing unusual about Breivik, who was an occasional customer at the bar.

Block B – Unter Arrest - References - Netflix