Britain's young drivers are some of the most dangerous in Europe. Barely Legal Drivers follows inexperienced teen drivers to see what they're really like behind the wheel. Each week two novices will be let loose on the road in their family car. They believe they're filming a slice of modern teenage life. In fact, it's all about their driving. They don't know their parents will be watching their every manoeuvre as the cars are fitted with state-of-art cameras and a telemetry recorder to secretly track all their journeys. Each teen will go on three road trips geared towards testing every aspect of their driving. At the end of it all, helped by a former traffic cop, the parents will have a decision to make. If they don't like the way the teens operate behind the wheel both of them could end up with advanced driving lessons. But if they think their kids' driving is up to scratch their teen will get a car that they can call their very own.

Barely Legal Drivers - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 2013-04-02

Barely Legal Drivers - The Fast and the Furious (2001 film) - Netflix

The Fast and the Furious is a 2001 action crime film directed by Rob Cohen, produced by Neal H. Moritz and written by Gary Scott Thompson and David Ayer. It is the first installment in The Fast and the Furious franchise. The film stars Paul Walker, Vin Diesel, Michelle Rodriguez, Jordana Brewster, Rick Yune, Chad Lindberg, Johnny Strong, and Ted Levine. The film follows undercover cop Brian O'Conner , who is tasked with stopping a group of unknown hijackers using high-performance racecars to hijack 18-wheelers. It is an international co-production between the United States and Germany. Inspiration for the film came from a Vibe magazine article titled “Racer X”, which detailed the illegal street racing circuit operating within New York City. Filming locations include New York City and New England, with a majority of the film being shot in Southern California. The Fast and the Furious was released on June 22, 2001, grossing over $207 million worldwide from an estimated $38 million budget. It was later re-released on June 22, 2016, to celebrate its 15th anniversary. It has a 53% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, which called it “sleek and shiny on the surface” in its critical consensus. The Fast and the Furious launched a franchise of seven sequels, starting with 2 Fast 2 Furious in 2003.

Barely Legal Drivers - Critical reception - Netflix

On Rotten Tomatoes, the film received a rating of 53% based on reviews from 147 critics and an average score of 5.4/10. The critical consensus reads: “Sleek and shiny on the surface, The Fast and the Furious recalls those cheesy teenage exploitation flicks of the 1950s.” On Metacritic, the film gained a metascore of 58 out of 100 based on reviews from 29 critics, indicating “mixed or average reviews”. Todd McCarthy of Variety called the film “a gritty and gratifying cheap thrill, Rob Cohen's high-octane hot-car meller is a true rarity these days, a really good exploitationer, the sort of thing that would rule at drive-ins if they still existed.” Kevin Thomas of the Los Angeles Times called it “an action picture that's surprising in the complexity of its key characters and portents of tragedy.” Vin Diesel's portrayal of Dominic Torretto won praise In particular with Reece Pendleton of the Chicago Reader writing “Diesel carries the movie with his unsettling mix of Zen-like tranquillity and barely controlled rage.” Other reviews were more mixed. Susan Wloszczyna of USA Today gave the film 2​1⁄2 out of 4 stars, saying that Cohen “at least knows how to keep matters moving and the action sequences exciting.” Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a C, saying it “works hard to be exciting, but the movie scarcely lives up to its title.” Rita Kempley of The Washington Post gave the film a scathing review, calling it “Rebel Without a Cause without a cause. The Young and the Restless with gas fumes. The Quick and the Dead with skid marks.” Paul Clinton of CNN wrote that Cohen “created a high-octane, rubber-burning extravaganza” but he criticized the film for “plot holes you could drive the proverbial truck through” and an idiotic ending.

Barely Legal Drivers - References - Netflix