Based on true historical accounts, Against the Wind covers 15 years of Australias most brutal Colonial past. It tells the story of Mary Mulvane, an 18 year old unfairly charged and sentenced to serve seven years as a convict, transported from Ireland to NSW in 1798. Destined to overcome the misery of a repressed life Mary's journey represents a gruelling chapter of the Australian experience. Surviving the hardship and horror of transportation to Australia, Mary faces an uncertain future in a savage land-establishing herself against the turbulent backdrop of Australia's Castle Hill Rebellion of 1804 and the 1808 Rum Rebellion.

Against the Wind - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 50 minutes

Premier: 1978-09-12

Against the Wind - Tacking (sailing) - Netflix

Tacking or coming about is a sailing maneuver by which a sailing vessel, whose desired course is into the wind, turns its bow toward the wind so that the direction from which the wind blows changes from one side to the other, allowing progress in the desired direction. The opposite maneuver to tacking is called jibing, or wearing on square-rigged ships, that is, turning the stern through the wind. No sailing vessel can move directly upwind, though that may be the desired direction, making this an essential maneuver of a sailing ship. A series of tacking moves, in a zig-zag fashion, is called beating, and allows sailing in the desired direction. This maneuver is used for different effects in races, where one ship is not only sailing in a desired direction, but also concerned with slowing the progress of competitors.

Against the Wind - The need for tacking - Netflix

Sailing ships cannot proceed directly into the wind, but often need to go in that direction. Movement is achieved by tacking. If a vessel is sailing on a starboard tack with the wind blowing from the right side and tacks, it will end up on a port tack with the wind blowing from the left side. See the image at the right; the red arrow indicates the wind direction. This maneuver is frequently used when the desired direction is (nearly) directly into the wind. In practice, the sails are set at an angle of 45° to the wind for conventional sailships and the tacking course is kept as short as possible before a new tack is set in. Rotor ships can tack much closer to the wind, 20 to 30°. The opposite maneuver, i.e. turning the stern through the wind, is called jibing (or wearing on square-rigged ships). Tacking more than 180° to avoid a jibe (mostly in harsh conditions) is sometimes referred to as a 'chicken jibe'.

Against the Wind - References - Netflix